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Charter School of Education and Human Sciences

Back to 2009-2011 undergraduate catalog home 

Dean: Jacqueline M. McDowell
Cook Hall Telephone: (706) 236-2202 Fax (706) 238-5827

The Charter School of Education and Human Sciences offers courses and field experiences in teacher education, psychology, health and physical education, and family studies. Five majors and four minors are offered through the Charter School.

Majors:

Early Childhood Education (B.S.) for teaching pre-kindergarten to grade 5

Exercise Science (B.S.)

Health and Physical Education (B.S.) for teaching pre-kindergarten to
grade 12

Middle-Grades Education (B.S.) for teaching grades 4-8

Psychology (B.A./B.S.)

Minors:

Secondary Education (for teaching grades 6-12. Students major in a subject area—English, biology, chemistry, physics, government, history, mathematics—and minor in education.)
P-12 Education (for teaching preschool through grade 12. Students major in a subject area—art, French, German, Spanish, health/physical education and music—and minor in education.)

Family Studies

Psychology

Effective professionals in education and psychology rely upon a strong knowledge base, intensive training, a strong code of ethics and significant and varied experience. The programs in the Charter School of Education and Human Sciences are innovative, academically challenging and field-based. Exciting opportunities are available for students with an interest in research to work with faculty on a variety of projects.

Education

Faculty: Professors Bell, Clement, Inman, Jennings, Jory, McDowell, Marlow, Pearson and Green Professor Wakefield; Associate Professors Belvin, Carpenter, Ference, Haney, Johnson-Pynn, Kurz and Prince; Assistant Professors Chapman, and Pu; Instructor Roe; Director of Field Experiences and Student Teaching Outlaw

The teacher-education programs at Berry have a long and distinguished history of excellence. Our faculty thrives on both proven and fresh ideas, superior teaching and “the personal touch.” Classes are usually small, allowing for individual attention and rich interactions among faculty and students. Because we think diverse experiences make stronger teachers, students have numerous opportunities for travel and study in international locales. Our common purpose is best expressed through the conceptual framework, “developers of human potential.” As developers of human potential, we have crafted a learning environment that values compassion, stimulates the intellect and encourages original thinking.

Berry’s three on-campus schools, the Child Development Center (for ages 3-5), the Berry College Elementary School (for grades K-6) and the Berry College Middle School (for grades 7-8), are private schools (open to the public) that provide models of best practice. The Child Development Center is housed in a set of log cabins on the main campus and features several play areas, including a large playground and a variety of outdoor classroom facilities. Located on a scenic hilltop on the mountain campus, Berry College Elementary School sports three playgrounds, a historic library and a gymnasium/auditorium. Two classrooms of middle-school students are also housed in the teacher-education building. The Child Development Center and Berry College Elementary and Middle Schools are used for observation, field experiences and student-teaching experiences.

Additional field experiences are scheduled in any one of several nearby schools with which Berry College has an extensive, ongoing, collaborative relationship. The Office of Field Experience and Student Teaching works diligently to place Berry students with some of the most outstanding teachers in the area. The Office of Field Experiences and Student Teaching monitors student progress toward teacher certification, from admission to the teacher-education programs through student teaching.

All certification requirements are established by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (PSC). Berry College standards are subject to change based on the PSC requirements.

Objectives

The objective of the teacher-education program is to prepare teachers who are developers of human potential. Martha Berry, the founder of Berry College, saw potential where others did not in the Appalachian youth for whom the Berry Schools and, later, the college were established. Like Martha Berry, we believe the role of excellent teachers is to develop the potential every student has to gain a lifelong appreciation of learning; to acquire the basic skills and wide repertoire of thinking strategies with which to construct and evaluate knowledge; to become morally responsible and fully participating partners in a democratic society within an ever-changing world; to develop and enhance a healthy self-esteem; and to work cooperatively with others to foster improvements in society.

In order to be developers of human potential, teachers should (1) promote reflection and decision making (head), (2) facilitate learning (hands) and (3) enhance self- and social awareness (heart). To meet the expectations of these roles, teachers’ actions must rest on the foundations of what they know through research (head), the collective wisdom of experience (hands) and their own values (heart). There must be a constant interaction between this knowing and doing. Teachers must continually reflect on lesson implementation, instructional materials used, student responses, school environment and values. This reflection in turn produces more knowledge, which is then used to refine what teachers do. The Field Experience Handbook elucidates the 10 principles that form the basis of the teacher-education program at Berry College.

Accredited Programs

Teacher-education programs, approved by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, and leading to teaching certification, are offered in these areas:
 

Early Childhood (P-5)
Middle Grades (4-8)
Secondary (7-12)
      English
      Mathematics
      Biology
      Chemistry
      Physics
      History
      Government
Preschool–12th Grade (P-12)
       Art
       Foreign Language
       French
       German
       Spanish
       Health and Physical Education
       Music
Requirements

Admission to Teacher-Education Program
A student who desires admission to the teacher-education program must meet the following criteria and assume responsibility for following guidelines published by the Charter School of Education and Human Sciences. Students are eligible to be considered for admission to the teacher-education program after they have accomplished the following:

  1. Completed EDU 102 with a C or better. Please note: A grade of C is equal to 2.0 on a 4-point scale; a grade of C- (1.7) is insufficient for courses requiring a C (2.0) or better.
  2. Completed two semesters of college work and have at least a 2.50 grade-point average.
  3. Passed the GACE Basic Skills Assessment or attained sufficient scores on the SAT or ACT as defined by the GA PSC to waive GACE requirements.
  4. Completed the application form for admission to the teacher-education program and the ethics statement and insurance-coverage waiver, and filed it along with two letters of recommendation from college faculty with the director of field experiences and student teaching in the Charter School of Education and Human Sciences.
  5. Satisfied an employment criminal-history clearance (completed background check).

Education courses at or above the 300 level may not be taken until the student is admitted to the teacher-education program. When students are accepted into the program, careful consideration is given in planning their academic program to ensure coordination between the major professor in their academic field and the director of field experiences and student teaching.

Requirements for Senior Practicum

Student teaching is a vital part of the teacher-education program. During the field-based senior year experience, students are supervised by a certified teacher with a minimum of three years’ in-field experience and by a Berry faculty member. Students participate in courses encouraging reflection on their experiences, thereby integrating college course work with classroom practice.

To be eligible for Senior Practicum, a student must have

  1. been admitted to the Teacher-Education Program;
  2. completed application for Student Teaching, including the advisor’s signature; submitted application form to the Office of Field Experience and Student Teaching by the third Friday of the semester, one (1) year before planning to begin the senior practicum;
  3. completed the biographical data form and submitted it to the Office of Field Experience and Student Teaching by the third Friday of the semester, one (1) semester before beginning the senior practicum;
  4. earned a grade of C (2.0) or better in each course in the major field;
  5. earned a grade of C (2.0) or better in each course taken in the professional-educational sequence;
  6. a 2.50 cumulative grade-point average; and
  7. received recommendation of the academic advisor and the director of field experiences and approval of the Admissions and Certification Committee;
  8. completed all assigned field experiences.
Requirements for Student Teaching (EDU 499)

Continuation in the field-based senior year is predicated upon the student’s progress in the initial semester of the senior practicum, as well as his/her progress in the academic coursework.

To be eligible to continue the field-based senior year, the student must have:

  1. the recommendation of the cooperating teacher;
  2. the recommendation of the college supervisor;
  3. completed the request form for continuing in student teaching, submitted to the Office of Field Experience and Student Teaching by the seventh week of the semester during Student Teaching;
  4. taken GACE Content Assessment prior to the beginning of the semester in which he/she is enrolled in EDU 499, and had scores sent to Berry College;
  5. maintained at least a 2.5 cumulative grade-point average;
  6. earned a C (2.0) or better in each course in the professional education sequence, the major field, COM 203 and an approved math course;
  7. earned a C (2.0) or better in ENG 102.

Applications should be made one year before the semester in which the student desires to engage in student teaching. For detailed requirements, see The Student Teaching Handbook, available in the office of the director of field experiences.

Special Qualifications

All teacher-preparation students are required to maintain a minimum grade of C in all education courses and in all subject-area courses counted toward the major. As a grade of C is equal to 2.0 on a 4-point scale; a grade of C- (1.7) is insufficient for courses requiring a C or better.

Prior to being certified in the state of Georgia, a student must pass the GACE Content Assessments in her or his area of preparation. Students must take the GACE Content Assessments and have the score released to Berry College prior to beginning the semester in which they are enrolled in EDU 499 or they will be required to complete another exit exam.

Graduate Programs

Berry College offers a Master of Education degree in early childhood (P-5) education, in middle-grades (4-8) education, in secondary (6-12) education and in reading. Also offered is an Education Specialist program with leadership focus. Details regarding these programs, admission requirements and course credits may be secured from the Charter School of Education and Human Sciences office, the dean of admissions or the Graduate Catalog. More information is available here.

Majors and Required Courses

Early Childhood Education Major (p-5)
The early childhood education major leads to the Bachelor of Science degree and prepares teachers for certification in preschool (P) through grade 5. Early childhood education teachers must have an extensive general education, a thorough understanding of the principles of human growth and development, specialized study in a variety of professional-education courses, experiences designed to prepare teachers for working with preschool children and planned field-based experiences with diverse and exceptional children. These experiences must provide application and synthesis of theoretical learnings.

Special Requirements
A minor is not required when majoring in early childhood education. ENG 204 and MAT 220 are to be taken as part of the general-education requirements.

Required Courses  

EDU 102 Orientation to Teacher Education 1-0-1
EDU 205 Foundations of Education and Psychology (Grades P-5) 3-0-3
EDU 221 Exploration of Diverse Cultures Seminar and  1-0-0
EDU 222 Exploration in Diverse Cultures or  1-4-3
EDU 223 Exploration of Diverse Cultures I and  2-0-2
EDU 224 Exploration of Diverse Cultures II 0-1-1
EDU 227 Preschool Curriculum and Methods 2-2-3
EDU 260 Technology Applications for Educators 2-0-2
EDU 320 Literacy I for Early Childhood 4-0-4
EDU 321WI Literacy II for Early Childhood 4-0-4
EDU 322 Integrated Arts and Cultures for Early Childhood I 3-0-3
EDU 323 Integrated Arts and Cultures for Early Childhood II 4-0-4
EDU 340 Inquiry in Science and Mathematics for Early Childhood 3-0-3
EDU 370WI Curriculum and Methods for Early Childhood I 2-2-3
 
EDU 371WI Curriculum and Methods for Early Childhood II 2-2-3
EDU 405 Instructional Management 2-0-2
EDU 429 Diagnosis and Correction of Reading 3-0-3
EDU 488 Senior Practicum 4 hours
EDU 490 Professional Seminar 1-0-1
EDU 495 Teaching of English as a Second Language: Methods and Materials 3-0-3
EDU 499 Student Teaching 9 hours
MAT 321 Mathematical Inquiry in Early
Childhood Education
3-0-3
PSY 225 Child Development 3-0-3
PSY 423 Introduction to Exceptional Children and Youth 1-0-1
PSY 424 Psychology and Education of Exceptional
Children and Youth
2-0-2
  Total 67 hours


Middle-Grades Education Major (4-8)
The middle-grades (MG) education major leads to the Bachelor of Science degree and prepares teachers for certification in grades 4-8. The middle-grades teacher must have a broad general education in addition to a knowledge of the techniques and materials needed to teach many different subjects.

Special requirements: ENG 204 and MAT 220 are to be taken as part of the general-education requirements. It is suggested that middle-grades majors have a faculty mentor in their area of primary concentration in addition to their education advisor.

Required Professional Courses 


Primary and Secondary Concentrations
Students majoring in middle-grades education are required to choose a primary concentration and a secondary concentration in addition to the professional-education courses. The primary concentration will be chosen from the areas of language arts, science, social studies or mathematics. The secondary concentration will be selected from one of the three areas not chosen for the primary. Some courses satisfying general-education requirements may also satisfy primary and secondary concentrations; however, courses satisfying professional education or the major may not be counted again in the concentration. Each concentration must consist of at least 15 hours.
 

EDU 102 Orientation to Teacher Education 1-0-1
EDU 206 Foundations of Education and Psychology (Grades 4-12) 3-2-4
EDU 215 Integrated Arts and Cultures for Middle Grades I 3-0-3
EDU 216 Integrated Arts and Cultures for Middle Grades II 3-0-3
EDU 221 Exploration in Diverse Cultures Seminar 1-0-0
EDU 222 Exploration in Diverse Cultures or  1-4-3
EDU 223 Exploration of Diverse Cultures I and  2-0-2
EDU 224 Exploration of Diverse Cultures II 0-1-1
EDU 260 Technology Applications for Educators 2-0-2
EDU 330 Literacy I for Middle Grades 3-0-3
EDU 331WI Literacy II for Middle Grades 3-0-3
EDU 341 Inquiry in Science and Mathematics for Middle Grades 3-0-3
EDU 375WI Curriculum and Methods I for the Early Adolescent Learner 2-2-3
EDU 376 Curriculum and Methods for Middle Grades II 2-2-3
EDU 405 Instructional Management 2-0-2
EDU 430 Reading in the Content Areas 3-0-3
EDU 489 Senior Practicum 2 hours
EDU 490 Professional Seminar 1-0-1
EDU 495 Teaching of English as a Second Language: Methods and Materials 3-0-3
EDU 499 Student Teaching 9 hours
MAT 322 Mathematical Inquiry in the Middle Grades 3-0-3
PSY 423 Introduction to Exceptional Children and Youth 1-0-1
PSY 424 Psychology and Education of Exceptional Children and Youth 2-0-2
  Total 57 hours
Language Arts     
COM 201 Mass Communication and Society 3-0-3
ENG 427 Young Adult Literature 3-0-3
  One course in writing from among the following:  
ENG 301 Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry 3-0-3
ENG 302 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction 3-0-3
ENG 303WI Advanced Rhetoric and Writing 3-0-3
  Six additional hours in ENG or COM  
Science     
  Students will complete one sequence of the following courses:  
BIO 111* Principles of Cell Biology and  3-2-4
BIO 112 Principles of Biology II 3-2-4
BIO 202 Principles of Zoology 3-2-4
BIO 215 Principles of Microbiology and Botany 3-2-4
GEO 101* Physical Geology and  3-2-4
GEO 102 Historical Geology 3-2-4
PHY 111* General Physics I with Algebra and   3-2-4
PHY 112 General Physics II with Algebra or   3-2-4
PHY 211* General Physics I with Calculus and   3-2-4
PHY 212 General Physics II with Calculus 3-2-4

Students must also take one course in each of the other two disciplines or chemistry for a total of four courses representing three different areas of science for a minimum total of 15 hours.
*Certain mathematics courses may be required for students taking this sequence.
 

Social Sciences     
HIS 154* World History to 1550 3-0-3
HIS 155* World History Since 1550 3-0-3
HIS 205 American History to 1877 3-0-3
SOC 335 Social Inequality: Race, Class and Gender or   3-0-3
GOV 300-level course    
 
Three additional hours in ECO, GOV or HUM*
 
Mathematics     
MAT 120 Precalculus 4-0-4
MAT 145 Applied Calculus or  3-0-3
MAT 201 Calculus I 4-0-4
MAT 220* Mathematics for Teachers P-8 3-0-3
MAT 324 Geometry for the Middle Grades 3-0-3
Three additional hours in MAT  
*May be taken as part of general education.
Total hours required 75-79
 
Minors and Required Courses

SECONDARY EDUCATION MINOR (LEADS TO CERTIFICATION FOR GRADES 6-12)
Students interested in teaching in grades 6-12 should have a major in a subject area and a minor in education. Secondary teacher certification is available in English, mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, history and government. Students seeking teacher certification at the secondary level have two advisors, a major advisor in the subject area and a minor advisor in education.

P-12 EDUCATION MINOR (PRESCHOOL THROUGH TWELFTH GRADE)
P-12 certification is available in art, French, German, Spanish, health and physical education and music. Students seeking P-12 teacher certification have two advisors, a major advisor in the subject area and a minor advisor in education.

Special requirements: ENG 204 is to be taken as part of the general-education requirement. The ESOL endorsement is required for all secondary and P-12 majors and is recommended for music majors.
Requirements  

EDU 102 Orientation to Teacher Education 1-0-1
EDU 206 Foundations of Education and Psychology (Grades 4-12) 3-2-4
EDU 221 Exploration in Diverse Cultures Seminar 1-0-0
EDU 222 Exploration in Diverse Cultures or  1-4-3
EDU 223 Exploration of Diverse Cultures I and  2-0-2
EDU 224 Exploration of Diverse Cultures II 0-1-1
EDU 380 Curriculum and Methods for Secondary Education 3-2-4
EDU 405 Instructional Management 2-0-2
EDU 489 Senior Practicum 2 hours
EDU 490 Professional Seminar 1-0-1
EDU 495 Teaching of English as a Second Language: Methods and Materials 3-0-3
EDU 499 Student Teaching 9 hours
PSY 423 Introduction to Exceptional Children and Youth 1-0-1
PSY 424 Psychology and Education of Exceptional Children and Youth 2-0-2

Special Qualifications
  1. English majors will also take EDU 430.
  2. Physical-education majors are required to take HPE 305 instead of EDU 380.
  3. Music majors will take MUS 305 instead of EDU 380.
  4. Art majors will also take ART 304.
  5. Foreign-language majors will also take 400 FLA listed in their majors.
  6. It is strongly recommended that all secondary and P-12 education students take EDU 260 Technology Applications for Educators or a computer class within their content area.

Family Studies Minor

Faculty: Professors Bell and Jory; Associate Professors Haney, Johnson-Pynn and
Johnston; Assistant Professor Allred
Cook Building, Room 261 Telephone: (706) 290-2640
 

Family Studies focuses on marriage and family education, family intervention services, and family policies.  The goal of Family Studies is to improve all types of families by applying scientific methods to questions about intimacy, relationships, parenting, dating, marriage development, sexuality, and diverse family forms.  Students can minor in family studies by declaring the minor through their academic  advisor.  The minor attracts students from many majors across campus, including religion, literature, psychology, sociology, history, communication, business and early childhood education.  For information, contact Dr. Brian Jory, Director of Family Studies, bjory@berry.edu.

The minor will consist of 18 hours.  The following courses are required:

 

FAM 230 Marriage and Family 3-0-3
FAM 330 WI Family Problems and Intervention 3-0-3
FIN 225 Personal Finance 3-0-3
PSY 221WI Life-Span Developmental Psychology 3-0-3
  and at least two of the following courses:  
EDU 440 Children in Families, Communities and Cultures 3-0-3
FAM 300 Family Life Education  3-0-3
FAM 496 Academic Internship 3 hours
PSY 342 Child and Adolescent Psychology 3-0-3
PSY 390 Adulthood and Aging 3-0-3
SOC 350 Sociology of the Family 3-0-3


Students are required to take these courses:

Kinesiology

Faculty: Professor Pearson; Associate Professor Kurz; Assistant Professor Baldwin-Lanier; Lecturers Beasley,
Canalis, Deaton, Farrer, Haarlow, Hightower, King, Preston, Schu, Thiermann, and Vardy
CAGE Center, Telephone: (706) 236-2225 • FAX (706) 802-6735
E-mail BOLD-HPE@berry.edu

General-education courses in health and physical education are designed to inform students about subjects of health, fitness and first aid; and to develop skills in the areas of sports, dance, aquatics and adventure-type activities. Emphasis is based on carry-over values for lifetime participation and enjoyment.

The department offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Physical Education with an Exercise Science emphasis. The major will offer a candidate a fine preparation for graduate studies in athletic training, physical therapy and/or exercise science specialties and will serve as preparation for fitness and wellness career opportunities.

A major in health and physical education (HPE) leads to a Bachelor of Science degree. The teacher-preparation area of concentration prepares the student for a teaching career, grades preschool through 12.

Objectives

The objectives of the area of health and physical education are to

  1. engage all students in wellness activities and develop in them an appreciation for lifetime fitness;
  2. prepare majors for successful careers in teaching and coaching; and
  3. prepare majors to participate actively in professional organizations.

Required courses for teacher-preparation concentration
 

BIO 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3-2-4*
BIO 207 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3-2-4
EDU 102 Orientation to Teacher Education 1-0-1
EDU 206 Foundations of Education and Psychology (Grades 4-12) 3-2-4
EDU 221 Exploration in Diverse Cultures Seminar and 1-0-0
EDU 222 Exploration in Diverse Cultures  or 1-4-3
EDU 223 Explorations in Diverse Cultures I and 2-0-2
EDU 224 Explorations in Diverse Cultures I 0-1-1
EDU 260 Technology Applications for Educators 2-0-2
EDU 405 Instructional Management 2-0-2
EDU 489 Senior Practicum 2 hours
EDU 490 Professional Seminar 1-0-1
EDU 495 Teaching of English as a Second Language: Methods and Materials 3-0-3
EDU 499 Student Teaching 9 hours
ENG 204 Introduction to Linguistics 3-0-3*
HPE 220 First Aid 2-0-1*
HPE 221 Survey of Fitness 0-2-1*
KIN 256 History and Principles of Health, Physical Education and Athletics 3-0-3
KIN 301 Techniques of Teaching Team and Individual Sports 1-2-3
KIN 305 Curriculum and Methods in Physical Education 3-2-4
KIN 306 Survey of Dance 3-0-3
KIN 309 Adapted Physical Education 3-0-3
KIN 310 Developmentally Appropriate Physical Education for P-6 3-0-3
KIN 311 Biomechanics 3-2-4
KIN 312WI Health for the Teacher 3-0-3
KIN 313 Community Health 3-0-3
KIN 314 Adventure Sports 1-2-3
KIN 330 Motor-Learning Behavior 3-0-3
KIN 411WI Exercise Physiology 3-2-4
MAT 111 Elementary Statistics 3-0-3*
PSY 423 Introduction to Exceptional Children and Youth 1-0-1
PSY 424 Psychology and Education of Exceptional Children and Youth 2-0-2
  Plus any other three credit courses offered in the department  
  Total
88 hours*

*One biology course, ENG 204, HPE 220, HPE 221 and MAT 111 may count as 12 hours of general education.


EXERCISE SCIENCE MAJOR (64 hours)

Required Courses 

 

BIO 111 Principles of Cell Biology 3-2-4
BIO 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3-2-4
BIO 207 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 3-2-4
HPE 220 First Aid 0-2-1
HPE 221 Survey of Fitness 0-2-1
KIN 256 History and Principles of Health, Physical Education and Athletics 3-0-3
KIN 311 Biomechanics 3-2-4
KIN 312WI Health for the Teacher 3-0-3
KIN 313 Community Health 3-0-3
KIN 330 Motor-Learning Behavior 3-0-3
KIN 404 Sport Administration 3-0-3
KIN 411WI Exercise Physiology 3-2-4
KIN 413 Exercise Assessment and Prescription 2-2-3
KIN 496 Academic Internship 9 hours
KIN 498 Directed Study in Nutritional Analysis 3 hours
MAT 111 Statistics 3-0-3
  plus at least eight hours from the following:  
BIO 202 Principles of Zoology 3-2-4
CHM 108 General Chemistry I 3-3-4
PHY 111 General Physics I with Algebra or 3-2-4
PHY 211 General Physics I with Calculus 3-2-4
*Two of the lab courses from different disciplines (BIO, CHM, PHY), MAT 111 and HPE 220 may satisfy 12 hours of the general-education requirements.  
Students who plan to attend graduate school may also want to complete CHM 109 General Chemistry II (3-3-4); Physics 112 General Physics II with Algebra (3-2-4), and a three-hour HPE elective.  


Psychology

Faculty: Professors Bell, Briggs, Jennings and McBrayer; Associate Professors
Bissonnette, Diliberto-Macaluso, Haney, Logsdon-Conradsen and Johnson-Pynn
Cook Building Telephone: (706) 290-2660

Objectives

The psychology major is a course of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. The psychology major fosters the development of student’s understanding of the theory and content of psychology; utilization of research methods and critical thinking skills; application of psychology to personal, social and organizational issues; and acting ethically based on the values of the profession. The major prepares students for graduate study and/or careers that apply their academic background in psychology.

 

Requirements 
40 hours
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology or  3-0-3
PSY 103 Psychology in Context 3-0-3
PSY 205 Orientation to Psychology 1-0-1
PSY 360WI Research Methods and Statistics I 3-0-3
PSY 361WI Research Methods and Statistics II 3-0-3
PSY 470 History and Systems of Psychology 3-0-3
 
Subtotal
13 hours
  plus at least three of four of the following courses:  
PSY 207 Psychology of Personality 3-0-3
PSY 221WI Life-Span Developmental Psychology 3-0-3
PSY 304 Social Psychology 3-0-3
PSY 318 Abnormal Psychology 3-0-3
 
minimum
9 hours
  and at least one course from:  
PSY 405WI Learning 3-0-3
PSY 406WI Cognitive Psychology 3-0-3
 
minimum
3 hours
  and at least one course from:  
PSY 410 Sensory and Perceptual Processes 3-0-3
PSY 411 Behavioral Neuroscience 3-0-3
 
minimum
3 hours
  and 12 hours of psychology electives  
 
Total
40 hours

Psychology Minor

A minor in psychology requires PSY 101or PSY 103 and 15 semester hours of psychology electives, nine of which must be at the 300-400 level.

Special Qualifications
Participation in a research practicum (PSY 298) requires at least sophomore status. Participation in an internship (PSY 496) and directed study (PSY 498) requires at least junior status. The internship consists of from three to six semester hours of credit and may, with permission, be repeated for a total of 12 hours of credit. No more than six internship credit hours may be applied to the psychology major, and no more than three internship credit hours may be applied to the psychology minor.

All psychology majors must complete the Educational Testing Service’s Major Field exam in psychology during their last semester.

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