Standards


FARM TOURS

Kindergarten

SKCS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a) Raise questions about the world around you and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations (5 senses) and trying things out.


SKCS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

a) Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.

b) Begin to draw pictures that portray features of the thing being described.


SKCS6. Students will understand the important features of the process of scientific inquiry. Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices.

a) In doing science, it is often helpful to work with a team and to share findings with others.

b) Tools such as ruler, magnifiers, and balance scales often give more information about things that can be obtained by just observing things without help.

c) Much can be learned about plants and animals by observing them closely, but care must be taken to know the needs of living things and how to provide for them (classroom pets).


SKE2. Students will describe the physical attributes of rocks and soils.

a) Use senses to observe and group rocks by physical attributes such as large/small, heavy/light, smooth/rough, dark/light/ etc.

b) Use senses to observe soils by physical attributes such as smell, texture, color, particle/grain size.

c) Recognize earth minerals-soil, rocks, water, air, etc. 


SKL1. Students will sort living organisms and non-living materials into groups by observable physical attributes.

a) Recognize the difference between living organisms and nonliving materials.

b) Group animals according to their observable features such as appearance, size, motion, where it lives, etc. (Example: A green frog has four legs and hops. A rabbit also hops.)

c) Group plants according to their observable feature such as appearance, size, etc.


SKL2. Students will compare the similarities and differences in groups of organisms.

a) Explain the similarities and differences in animals. (color, size, appearance, etc,)

b) Explain the similarities and differences in plants. (color, size, appearance, etc.)

c) Recognize the similarities and differences between a parent and a baby.

d) Match pictures of animal parents and their offspring explaining your reasoning. (Example: dog/puppy; cat/kitten; cow/calf; duck/ducklings, etc.)

e) Recognize that you are similar and different from other students, (senses, appearance)


First Grade

S1CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a) Raise the questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations and measurements and trying to figure things out.


S1CS4. Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

a) Use a model-such as a toy or a picture-to describe a feature of the primary thing.

b) Describe changes in the size, weight, color, or movement of things, and note which of their other qualities remain the same during a specific change.

c) Compare very different sizes, weights, ages (baby/adult), and speeds (fast/slow) of both human made and natural things.


S1CS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

a) Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.

b) Draw pictures (grade level appropriate) that correctly portray features of the thing being described.

c) Use simple pictographs and bar graphs to communicate data.


S1CS7. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry. Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

a) Scientists use a common language with precise definitions of terms to make it easier to communicate their observations to each other.

b) In doing science, it is often helpful to work as a team. All team members should reach individual conclusions and share their understandings with other members of the team in order to develop a consensus.

c) Tools such as thermometers, rulers and balances often give more information about things than can be obtained by just observing things without help.

d) Much can be learned about plants and animals by observing them closely, but care must be taken to know the needs of living things and how to provide for them.


S1L1. Students will investigate the characteristics and basic needs of plants and animals.

a) Identify the basic needs of a plant.

1) Air

2) Water

3) Light

4) Nutrients

b) Identify the basic needs of an animal.

1) Air

2) Water

3) Food

4) Shelter

c) Identify the parts of a plant-roots, stem, leaf, and flower.

d) Compare and describe various animals-appearance, motion, growth, basic needs.


Second Grade

S2CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a) Raise questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations and measurements and trying to figure things out. 


S2CS4. Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

a) Identify the parts of things, such as toys or tools, and identify what things can do when put together that they could not do otherwise.

b) Use a model-such as a toy or a picture-to describe a feature of the primary thing.

c) Describe changes in the size, weight, color, or movement of things, and note which of their other qualities remain the same during a specific change.

d) Compare very different sizes, weights, ages (baby/adult), and speeds (fast/slow) of both human made and natural things.


S2CS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

a) Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.

b) Draw pictures (grade level appropriate) that correctly portray features of the thing being described.

c) Use simple pictographs and bar graphs to communicate data.


S2CS7. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

a) Scientists use a common language with precise definitions of terms to make it easier to communicate their observations to each other.

b) In doing science, it is often helpful to work as a team. All team members should reach their own individual conclusions and share their understandings with other members of the team in order to develop a consensus.

c) Tools such as thermometers, rulers and balances often give more information about things than can be obtained by just observing things without help.

d) Much can be learned about plants and animals by observing them closely, but care must be taken to know the needs of living things and how to provide for them.


S2L1. Students will investigate the life cycles of different living organisms.

a) Determine the sequence of the life cycle of common animals in you area: a mammal such as a car or dog or classroom pet, a bird such as a chicken, an amphibian such as a frog, and an insect such as a butterfly.

b) Relate seasonal changes to observations of how a tree changes throughout a school year.

c) Investigate the life cycle of a plant by growing a plant from a seed and by recording changes over a period of time.

d) Identify fungi (mushroom) as living organisms.


Third Grade

S3CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a) Keep records of investigations and observations and do not alter the records later.

b) Offer reasons for findings and consider reasons suggested by others.

c) Take responsibility for understanding the importance of being safety conscious.


S3CS4. Students will use ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

a) Observe and describe how parts influence one another in things with many parts.

b) Use geometric figures, number sequences, graphs, diagrams, sketches, number lines, maps, and stories to represent corresponding features of objects, events, and processes in the real world.

c) Identify ways in which the representations do not match their original counterparts.


S3CS8. Student will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

a) Scientific investigations may take many different forms, including observing what things are like or what is happening somewhere, collecting specimens for analysis, and doing experiments.

b) Clear and active communication is an essential part of doing science. It enables scientists to inform other about their work, expose their ideas to criticism by other scientists, and stay informed about scientific discoveries around the world.

c) Scientists use technology to increase their power to observe things and the measure and compare things accurately.

d) Science involves many different kinds of work and engages men and women of all ages and backgrounds. 


S3L1. Students will investigate the habitats of different organisms and the dependence of organisms on their habitat.

a) Differentiate between habitats of Georgia (mountains, marsh/swamp, coast, Piedmont, Atlantic Ocean? and the organisms that live there.

b) Identify features of green plants that allow them to live and thrive in different regions of Georgia.

c) Identify features of animals that allow them to live and thrive in different regions of Georgia.

d) Explain what will happen to an organism if the habitat is changed.


Dairy tours 

Kindergarten

SKCS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and

 skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to

 understand how the world works.

 

SKCS2. Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data

 and following scientific explanations.

 

SKCS4. Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring

 scientific and technological matters.

 

SKCS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

SKCS6. Students will understand the important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

 

SKL1. Students will sort living organisms and non-living materials into groups by observable

physical attributes.

 

SKL2. Students will compare the similarities and differences in groups of organisms.

   

First Grade

S1CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.
 

S1CS2. Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

 

S1CS3. Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities.

 

S1CS4. Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

 

S1CS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

 

S1CS6. Students will be familiar with the character of scientific knowledge and how it is achieved.

S1CS7. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

S1L1. Students will investigate the characteristics and basic needs of plants and animals.

 

Second Grade

S2CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

 

S2CS2. Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

 

S2CS4. Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

 

S2CS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

 

S2CS6. Students will be familiar with the character of scientific knowledge and how it is achieved.

S2CS7. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

S2E3. Students will observe and record changes in their surroundings and infer the causes of the changes.

S2L1. Students will investigate the life cycles of different living organisms.

   

Third Grade

 

S3CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

 

S3CS2. Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

 

S3CS3. Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities utilizing safe laboratory procedures.

 

S3CS8. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

 

S3L1. Students will investigate the habitats of different organisms and the dependence of organisms on their habitat.

 

Fourth Grade

S4CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.
 

S4CS2. Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

 

S4CS3. Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities utilizing safe laboratory procedures.

 

S4CS8. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Fifth Grade

S5CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.
 

S5CS2. Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

 

S5CS3. Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating objects in scientific activities.

 

S5CS8. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

 

S5L2. Students will recognize that offspring can resemble parents in inherited traits and learned behaviors.

 

S5L4. Students will relate how microorganisms benefit or harm larger organisms.

 

Sixth Grade

S6CS1. Students will explore the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the

world works.

 

S6CS2. Students will use standard safety practices for all classroom laboratory and field

investigations.

 

S6CS3. Students will use computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data

and following scientific explanations.

 

S6CS4. Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating equipment and materials in scientific activities.

 

S6CS9. Students will investigate the features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices

 

Seventh Grade

S7CS1. Students will explore of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and

skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand

how the world works.

 

S7CS2. Students will use standard safety practices for all classroom laboratory and field

investigations.

 

S7CS3. Students will have the computation and estimation skills necessary for analyzing data and following scientific explanations.

 

S7CS4. Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating equipment and materials in scientific activities.

 

Eighth Grade

S8CS1. Students will explore the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the

world works.

 

S8CS2. Students will use standard safety practices for all classroom laboratory and field

investigations.

 

S8CS4. Students will use tools and instruments for observing, measuring, and manipulating equipment and materials in scientific activities utilizing safe laboratory procedures.

 

S8CS7. Students will question scientific claims and arguments effectively.


Wildlife in My Backyard

Kindergarten

SKCS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a. Raise questions about the world around you and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations (5 senses) and trying things out.


SKCS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

a. Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.

b. Begin to draw pictures that portray features of the thing being described.


SKCS6. Students will understand the important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

a. In doing science, it is often helpful to work with a team and to share findings with others.

b. Tools such as rulers, magnifiers, and balance scales often give more information about things than can be obtained by just observing things without help.

c. Much can be learned about plants and animals by observing them closely, but care must be taken to know the needs of living things and how to provide for them (classroom pets).


SKL1. Students will sort living organisms and non-living materials into groups by observable physical attributes.

a. Recognize the difference between living organisms and nonliving materials.

b. Group animals according to their observable features such as appearance, size, motion, where it lives, etc. (Example: A green frog has four legs and hops. A rabbit also hops.)

c. Group plants according to their observable features such as appearance, size, etc. 


SKL2. Students will compare the similarities and differences in groups of organisms.

a. Explain the similarities and differences in animals. (color, size, appearance, etc.)

b. Explain the similarities and differences in plants. (color, size, appearance, etc.)

c. Recognize the similarities and differences between a parent and a baby.

d. Match pictures of animal parents and their offspring explaining your reasoning. (Example: dog/puppy; cat/kitten; cow/calf; duck/ducklings, etc.)

e. Recognize that you are similar and different from other students. (senses, appearance)


First Grade

S1CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a. Raise questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations and measurements and trying to figure things out.


S1CS4. Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

a. Use a model—such as a toy or a picture—to describe a feature of the primary thing.

b. Describe changes in the size, weight, color, or movement of things, and note which of their other qualities remain the same during a specific change.

c. Compare very different sizes, weights, ages (baby/adult), and speeds (fast/slow) of both human made and natural things.


S1CS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

a. Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.

b. Draw pictures (grade level appropriate) that correctly portray features of the thing being described.

c. Use simple pictographs and bar graphs to communicate data.


S1CS7. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

a. Scientists use a common language with precise definitions of terms to make it easier to communicate their observations to each other.

b. In doing science, it is often helpful to work as a team. All team members should reach individual conclusions and share their understandings with other members of the team in order to develop a consensus.

c. Tools such as thermometers, rulers and balances often give more information about things than can be obtained by just observing things without help.

d. Much can be learned about plants and animals by observing them closely, but care must be taken to know the needs of living things and how to provide for them. 


S1L1. Students will investigate the characteristics and basic needs of plants and animals.

a. Identify the basic needs of a plant.

1. Air

2. Water

3. Light

4. Nutrients

b. Identify the basic needs of an animal.

1. Air

2. Water

3. Food

4. Shelter

c. Identify the parts of a plant—root, stem, leaf, and flower.

d. Compare and describe various animals—appearance, motion, growth, basic needs.


Second Grade

S2CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and

skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a. Raise questions about the world around them and be willing to seek answers to some of the questions by making careful observations and measurements and trying to figure things out.


S2CS4. Students will use the ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

a. Identify the parts of things, such as toys or tools, and identify what things can do when put together that they could not do otherwise.

b. Use a model—such as a toy or a picture—to describe a feature of the primary thing.

c. Describe changes in the size, weight, color, or movement of things, and note which of their other qualities remain the same during a specific change.

d. Compare very different sizes, weights, ages (baby/adult), and speeds (fast/slow) of both human made and natural things. 


S2CS5. Students will communicate scientific ideas and activities clearly.

a. Describe and compare things in terms of number, shape, texture, size, weight, color, and motion.

b. Draw pictures (grade level appropriate) that correctly portray features of the thing being described.

c. Use simple pictographs and bar graphs to communicate data.


S2CS7. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

a. Scientists use a common language with precise definitions of terms to make it easier to communicate their observations to each other.

b. In doing science, it is often helpful to work as a team. All team members should reach their own individual conclusions and share their understandings with other members of the team in order to develop a consensus.

c. Tools such as thermometers, rulers and balances often give more information about things than can be obtained by just observing things without help.

d. Much can be learned about plants and animals by observing them closely, but care must be taken to know the needs of living things and how to provide for them. 


S2L1. Students will investigate the life cycles of different living organisms.

a. Determine the sequence of the life cycle of common animals in your area: a mammal such as a cat or dog or classroom pet, a bird such as a chicken, an amphibian such as a frog, and an insect such as a butterfly.

b. Relate seasonal changes to observations of how a tree changes throughout a school year.

c. Investigate the life cycle of a plant by growing a plant from a seed and by recording changes over a period of time.

d. Identify fungi (mushroom) as living organisms.


Third Grade

S3CS1. Students will be aware of the importance of curiosity, honesty, openness, and

skepticism in science and will exhibit these traits in their own efforts to understand how the world works.

a. Keep records of investigations and observations and do not alter the records later.

b. Offer reasons for findings and consider reasons suggested by others.

c. Take responsibility for understanding the importance of being safety conscious.


S3CS4. Students will use ideas of system, model, change, and scale in exploring scientific and technological matters.

a. Observe and describe how parts influence one another in things with many parts.

b. Use geometric figures, number sequences, graphs, diagrams, sketches, number lines, maps, and stories to represent corresponding features of objects, events, and processes in the real world.

c. Identify ways in which the representations do not match their original counterparts.


S3CS8. Students will understand important features of the process of scientific inquiry.

Students will apply the following to inquiry learning practices:

a. Scientific investigations may take many different forms, including observing what things are like or what is happening somewhere, collecting specimens for analysis, and doing experiments.

b. Clear and active communication is an essential part of doing science. It enables scientists to inform others about their work, expose their ideas to criticism by other scientists, and stay informed about scientific discoveries around the world.

c. Scientists use technology to increase their power to observe things and to measure and compare things accurately.

d. Science involves many different kinds of work and engages men and women of all ages and backgrounds.


S3L1. Students will investigate the habitats of different organisms and the dependence of organisms on their habitat.

a. Differentiate between habitats of Georgia (mountains, marsh/swamp, coast, Piedmont, Atlantic Ocean) and the organisms that live there.

b. Identify features of green plants that allow them to live and thrive in different regions of Georgia.

c. Identify features of animals that allow them to live and thrive in different regions of Georgia.

d. Explain what will happen to an organism if the habitat is changed.