Anthropology

ANT 305

xANT 345 / ENV 400

ANT 3 55  / ENV 400

ANT 380 / ENV 400

BIOLOGY

BIO 215

Business

BUS 498

Communication

COM 380

COM 385

ENGLISH

ENG 475

Environmental science

ENV 400 / ANT 345

ENV 400 / ANT 355

ENV 400 / ANT 380

Management

MGT 498

Psychology

PSY 316

PSY 434

PSY 443

Sociology

SOC 305

SOC 375

Spanish

SPA 290

Theatre

THE 228

Women's Studies

WNS 412


ANT 345  / ENV 400

Anthropology of Food

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Instructor | Dr. Brian Campbell | bcampbell@berry.edu
Course Rotation | Fall of odd years
Prerequisites | ANT 200 or SOC 200 or ENV 150

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COURSE DESCRIPTION | This course explores the interconnections between distinctive cultures and ethnicities and their food traditions, including production and preparation strategies and consumption and waste patterns. What we eat reveals cultural and biophysical influences that range from sociocultural traditions, gender, politics, and religion, to habitat, environmental health, and human biology. 

COMMUNITY PARTNER | Students will work closely with Action Ministries Rome to better understand the connection between people, food, and community. Students will volunteer at the food pantry, work in the gardens, and cook a meal with on-site ingredients.



ANT 355 / ENV 400 

ENVIRONMENTAL ANTHROPOLOGY

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Instructor | Dr. Brian Campbell | bcampbell@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Every other year

Prerequisites* | ANT 200 or ENV 150 

*can be waived at instructor’s discretion

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COURSE DESCRIPTION | Environmental Anthropology is a course that provides an introduction to human/environmental interactions from diverse anthropological perspectives and allows you to engage your local environment, working with your hands, but also your heart and mind, "getting dirty" in the sense of pondering all the microbiota in our soil and how our behaviors impact them. 

 COMMUNITY PARTNER | The community engagement component relates to the service learning workshops whereby we collaborate with  Action Ministries Rome on developing the infrastructure for the gardens and planting in them to provide additional fresh food to the food insecure population of Floyd County who utilize the generosity of the food pantry. 

Syllabus



ANT 380 / ENV 400

Applying Anthropology

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Instructor | Dr. Brian Campbell | bcampbell@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Fall of even years

Prerequisites | ANT 200 or ENV 150 *can be waived at instructor's discretion

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COURSE DESCRIPTION | This course utilizes an anthropological framework to understand and address public policy issues, contemporary environmental, health, and social problems, and the associated ethical issues and practical constraints and obstacles encountered when conducting applied research. It emphasizes the methods and skills necessary for successful professional roles working with non-profit institutions, companies, and governments to plan, implement, and evaluate programs, products, services, policies, and laws.

COMMUNITY PARTNER | Actual case examples and participatory research with Floyd County community partners anchors and brings alive course discussion and readings. We work with Rome Action Ministries, Keep Rome Floyd Beautiful, CRBI, and South Rome Community Garden.

Syllabus



BIO 215

Principles of Microbiology and Botany

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Instructor | Dr. Martin Cipollini | mcipollini@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Usually in the Fall

Prerequisites | BIO 111 or EVS 104 

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COURSE DESCRIPTION  |  This course, part of the three-course introductory biology sequence, will provide an introduction to the biodiversity of viruses, prokaryotes, protists, fungi and plants, and an overview of plant physiology. It is designed to provide biology majors with a comprehensive, albeit introductory, base of knowledge in the field of biology. This essential background information will form the foundation for understanding material in more advanced courses in the biological sciences, and for future professional endeavors.

COMMUNITY PARTNER |  The partner is the Georgia Chapter of the American Chestnut Foundation. The community outreach component involves work on the American chestnut blight-resistance breeding program, which is part of a national effort to restore blight-stricken American chestnut to the wild. Students help collect data in support of Georgia’s blight- resistance breeding program and assist in orchard establishment and maintenance on Berry’s campus as well as other sites in the state.

Syllabus



BUS 498 / MGT 498

Advanced Business Planning Directed Study

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Instructor | Dr. Paula Englis | penglis@berry.edu

Course Rotation | On demand as a directed study

Prerequisites | None 

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COURSE DESCRIPTION  |  This course is an advanced, integrative and experiential approach to entrepreneurship and/or business analysis. There is no “mandated” community engagement, but students can work on their own projects or with a group from the community. 

This course emphasizes developing effective strategies to compete in (startup) organizations that operate within dynamic industry environments. Students will gain better understanding of the complex role of social, technological, economic and political forces on business strategy and will gain a thorough understanding of industry dynamics and industry attractiveness. Student will work closely with faculty member to develop a case study/business plan/research paper that is publishable. 

COMMUNITY PARTNER |  Students have reached out to and been contacted by different volunteer and non-profit organizations in the community. These include Rome Reads with the Mount Berry Mall and DIGS. If students are interested in working with a non-profit, they can contact that non-profit and propose their idea. Also, be sure to ask if Dr. Englis has received any requests for assistance from other community partners. 

Syllabus


COM 380

Public Relations Writing 

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Instructor | Dr. Samantha Nazione | snazione@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Every Spring

Prerequisites | COM 250 

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COURSE DESCRIPTION  |  Public Relations Writing (COM 380) is an undergraduate seminar in the basic skills needed to master public relations writing and dissemination of that writing for traditional and new media formats. Students will learn to brand themselves as public relations professionals through their writing.

COMMUNITY PARTNER |  This class will require students to partner with an outside non-profit organization of their choice in order to create legitimate media materials that can be disseminated (and hopefully published to add to the student’s portfolio). Students are responsible for securing their community partner for this class.

Syllabus



COM 385

Public Relations Cases and Campaigns

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Instructor | Dr. Samantha Nazione | snazione@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Every Spring

Prerequisites | COM 375 

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COURSE DESCRIPTION  |  Public Relations Cases and Campaigns (COM 385) is an undergraduate seminar in the creation of strategic communication campaigns. Concepts to be covered include defining a campaign and expressing creativity, as well as identifying goals, objectives, and the target audience for a campaign.

COMMUNITY PARTNER |  This course features learning through a hands-on, group experience with community partners in need of assistance to research and prepare an integrated public relations campaign.

Syllabus




ENG 475

Writing and Community

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Instructor | Dr. Sandra Meek | smeek@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Check course registry

Prerequisites | ENG 470 or ENG 471 or ENG 305

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COURSE DESCRIPTION  |  This senior-level seminar class will consider the many ways creative writing can be integrated into community service. Students will grapple with underlying questions regarding the relationship between the individual artist and the community, such as where do we draw the line, if we can, between art for art's sake, and "therapeutic" writing? The course will also consider other aspects of the writer's life--including publication, translation, and criticism--from the perspective of communal service. Students will be challenged to think deeply about their own relationship, present and future, with their communities as individual writers.

COMMUNITY PARTNER |  We will be responding to community needs and creating a service program from scratch that offers local high school students a place to learn about and create their own creative writing. 

Syllabus




PSY 316

Counseling Practice

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Instructor | Dr. Gerald Jennings | jjennings@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Every Spring

Prerequisites | PSY 315 

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COURSE DESCRIPTION  |  The purpose of this course is to follow PSY 315 (Counseling Theory) with a field based practicum course enabling the student to observe and experience the application of various counseling/personnel approaches. The student will meet in class for one hour a week with the college instructor. The purpose of this class meeting will be to discuss field experiences and to review significant aspects of the helping relationship.

COMMUNITY PARTNER |  Each student selects a community agency for the counseling experience. Area business/industry, Floyd Behavioral Health; Three Rivers Behavioral Health, Substance Abuse Center; Public Schools; Juvenile Courts; Offender Rehabilitation/Victim Witness; Floyd Medical Center; Vocational Rehabilitation; Department of Family and Children's Services; Nursing Home; Senior Center; Psychoeducational Center; Open Door Home; Community Treatment Center; Hospitality House; and Family Resource Center are among alternatives available for student practicums.

Syllabus


PSY 434

Introduction to Exceptional Children and Youth

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Instructor | Dr. Michelle Haney | mhaney@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Every Fall / some Summers

Prerequisites | PSY 101 is encouraged

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COURSE DESCRIPTION | This course is an introduction to assessment procedures and strategies for identifying and addressing the needs of students with exceptionalities within the context of school. Field-based practice occurs through student teaching or community resources. In addition to field experience in the public schools, we partner with various community groups as part of our field experience component. 

COMMUNITY PARTNER | Community partnerships have included Floyd County Parent to Parent, Navigator Team, Sib Shops organization through Georgia State University, and currently DIGS (Developing Independence, Growth, and Security) for adults with developmental disabilities. DIGS  is an excellent example of an organization that promotes and builds bridges to such opportunities for life long recreation, skill growth and learning, and independence for adults with developmental disabilities. DIGS is a nonprofit group that provides social and recreational opportunities, learning, and potentially housing for adults with developmental disabilities after high school. One reason we collaborate and spend time with this adult population is to consider how to prepare our special education students for a life of inclusion in their communities and maximum independence.

Syllabus


  

PSY 443

PARENTING AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT

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Instructor | Dr. Casey Dexter |  cdexter@berry.edu  

Course Rotation | Spring of even years

Prerequisites | PSY 101

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COURSE DESCRIPTION | The course is intended to provide an introductory overview of parenting and its effect on child development from an attachment framework.  The goal of the community engagement component is to explore parenting and child development from an “insider's perspective.” Students may accomplish this by attending positive parenting classes, parent-to-parent meetings, etc. These opportunities will be made possible through Rome community partnerships already set-up by the instructor or within already existing community partnerships students have established.  

COMMUNITY PARTNER | The main community partner is the  Floyd County School System.  In particular, students will be working with Tina Black, the parent involvement coordinator for the school system.  Additionally, students have the opportunity to engage with various other parenting organizations in the greater Rome area including organizations such as:  Rome Youth for Christ (offers programming for teen parents)  



SOC/ANT 305

Social Science Research Methods

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Instructor | Dr. Sarah Allred | sallred@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Every Fall

Prerequisites | None

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COURSE DESCRIPTION | The purpose of this course is to provide students with the core conceptual knowledge, practical skills and applied opportunities necessary for critiquing, designing, and implementing a simple, social science study.  The course addresses all main aspects of the research process, provides students numerous active learning activities inside and outside the classroom, and concludes with the presentation of an original research project.  

 COMMUNITY PARTNER | The class works with various service sites in the area. These organizations include, but are not restricted to:

  • South Rome Redevelopment Corporation
  • Rome City Schools
  • GA NW Technical College
  • American Red Cross

Syllabus


SOC 375

Sociology of Disability

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Instructor | Dr. Sarah Allred | sallred@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Every Spring

Prerequisites |  None

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COURSE DESCRIPTION | Engagement through the Inside-out course is derived from the learning experience overall. Two groups of students learn together as equals, in the setting of a local prison.  Half of the students are incarcerated at the prison, the other half are Berry students.  Most, but not all, of the Inside students have had some prior college experiences. Most are high school graduates. Engagement is best considered as something that happens in the context of the prison, in the company of “the other,” when we read and discuss together about aspects, policies, etc concerning corrections. In the most recent course, disability issues in the context of corrections were examined: aging issues, mental illness, and physical disability issues.

 Note: Inside-Out is a pedagogy that may be used to teach on a range of topics. In the past several years, the pedagogy has been applied within sociology elective courses that have an established rotation in the Sociology department.

COMMUNITY PARTNER | Warden Jeff Chandler of the Floyd County Prison began partnering with Berry College to hold the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program in the spring of 2011. Prior to this, Inside-Out courses were offered at the Floyd County Jail. The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program is an international program that creates partnerships between higher learning institutions and correctional facilities in order to “deepen the conversation about and transform approaches to understanding crime, justice, freedom, inequality and other issues of social concern.”

Syllabus


SPA 290

Spanish in Context

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Instructor | Dr. Barnes, Dr. Slade or Dr. Tate | jbarnes@berry.edu, dslade@berry.edu or jtate@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Every Semester

Prerequisites* | SPA 200

*can be waived at instructor’s discretion

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COURSE DESCRIPTION  |  This course promotes Spanish language proficiency in all four skill areas, with a particular focus on reading and writing, and deepens students' cultural awareness. Through a thorough review and expansion of Spanish vocabulary and grammar, the course serves as a bridge between the basic language sequence and upper-level courses.

Students enrolled in this course are required to participate for one to two hours per week in community initiatives using their Spanish-language skills.

COMMUNITY PARTNER |  Most students choose to volunteer one night a week (either a Tuesday or a Thursday) with the Berry College ESL classes, which are held in Evans building. There are other options as well, including volunteering with the YMCA and assisting with ESL classes at the public library, for example. However in these cases, you will need to take the initiative immediately and arrange them.

Syllabus

PHOTOS |   

SPA290 A SPA290 B SPA290 D SPA290 C

VIDEO


THE 228

Applied Theatre

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Instructor | Dr. John Countryman | jcountryman@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Fall of even years

Prerequisites | None

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COURSE DESCRIPTION | Applied Theatre is the name given to the use of teacher artists and “spect-actors” (audience/participants) to engage in theatrical activities of concern to the community at large (or some sector of it) and to address social issues of genuine concern to our citizens. 

It is intended, in some fashion, to negotiate a means to “make a difference” in the realm of crime, drug abuse, domestic violence, child abuse, disease prevention, and other issues of concern. Beyond becoming knowledgeable about the concepts associated with applied theatre and drama, students will learn skills in improvisational, interactive and participatory theatre, as well as learn to facilitate applied theatre workshops. 

COMMUNITY PARTNER | Students spend approximately the first half of the semester learning and practicing interactive and improvisational skills. The second half of the semester is spent performing in the community. Applied Theatre students have performed for a number of organizations and a variety of audiences. One of their recent audiences included the guests of the Davies Homeless Shelter: a safe haven that offers homeless individuals caring support through vital services including but not limited to housing, meals, clothing, counseling and educational opportunities, as well as the restoration of hope.

Syllabus



WNS 412

Women’s and Gender Studies Seminar

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Instructor | Dr. Susan Conradsen | sconradsen@berry.edu

Course Rotation | Offered Spring 2015

Prerequisites* | Junior/Senior WNS 210 

*can be waived at instructor’s discretion

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COURSE DESCRIPTION | This class will cover a spectrum of topics focused on social justice, activism, and feminist theory. The class will be based in discussion focused seminar with material coming from movies, documentaries and novels. The class will also be focused on a community project that deals with hunger and poverty. 

COMMUNITY PARTNER | We will be working closely with Action Ministries to help raise awareness and host two movie screenings. The class currently has an expectation of 20 hours working with the project which will help the Atlanta Food Bank.

WNS 412 Flyer