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Spring 2012 Honors Courses

 

Honors 201, Perennial Questions (3 Hours Credit)

HON 201 H Section A 

Life, Law, Justice & Mercy    TH 3:30–4:45        Dr. Brian Carroll 

Course meets these requirements:  

  • Required course for all Honors students  
  • Counts as the 100-level religion course requirement or the fifth free elective course in the Humanities general education core (3 of 15 hours required)  

Course description:  

Life, Law, Justice & Mercy: Is God there? Does he care? Is he fair? These questions guide the course's intensive study of the Apostle Paul's epistle to the Romans, a study that forces questions about, among other things, law, society, government, women's rights, and slavery and freedom. 

 

Honors 201, Perennial Questions (3 Hours Credit)

HON 201 H Section B  

What is a Good Life?      TH 12:30–1:45        Dr. Brian Carroll 

 

Course meets these requirements:  

  • Required course for all Honors students  
  • Counts as the 200-level literature requirement or the fifth free elective course in the Humanities general education core (3 of 15 hours required)  

Course description: 

 
What is a Good Life: The course investigates the “perennial question” of what makes a life “good” and how best one might understand and pursue that “good life.” Readings from classical and contemporary philosophy, literature, psychology, sociology, pop-culture, religion and education each provide perspectives on the question of “What is a Good Life?” A selection of films provide further perspective on the basic issue of the good life.
 

 

HON 203 H, Democracy and Its Friendly Critics (3 Hours Credit)

HON 203 HA   Democracy and Its Friendly Critics TH  2:00 - 3:15            Dr. M. Bailey 

HON 203 HB   Democracy and Its Friendly Critics MWF 10:00 – 10:50   Dr. Eric Sands 

Course meets these requirements:  

  • Required course for all Honors students  
  • General Education core requirement in Behavioral & Social Sciences -- 200 level for Government and International Studies.  

Course description: 

 
America's leading statesmen such as James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln and Franklin Roosevelt understood that popular government is extremely difficult to sustain. They understood what we largely have forgotten: Democracy, like all forms of government, comes with its own set of challenges and pathologies. These lessons about democracy are best expressed by Alexis de Tocqueville, a critic, albeit a friendly one, of American democracy who thoughtfully and forcefully articulated the dangers facing the emerging democratic world. This course will use Tocqueville's Democracy in America to illustrate the perpetual issues and problems of democracy—many of which are still very real despite our being blind to them—and we will also draw on works of literature, philosophy, film, and theology to give concrete meaning to these problems as they are manifested in American political and social life.
 

HON 203 H, Democracy and Its Friendly Critics (3 Hours Credit)

HON 203 HC   Democracy and Its Friendly Critics MWF 12:00-12:50       Dr. McKenzie   

  

Course meets these requirements:  

  • Required course for all honors students  
  • General Education core requirement in Humanities--100 level for Philosophy.  
  • May also count as the fifth humanities elective, if religion or philosophy course requirement has been met by other means (e.g. AP credit).  

Course description: 

 
The motto “e pluribus unum” was inscribed on the United States National Seal, created by the Continental Congress during the Revolutionary War Period. The motto referred originally to the one nation arising from the many nations whose settlers came to America and from the thirteen states which constituted the original union. The idea that it would be possible to create a nation that really is “one, from many” is a seminal idea of American history. As the phrase comes to us, it stands more broadly for the dialectic of the one and the many in American experience, reflected in a wide array of issues. This course focuses on certain moments in this rich dialectic in which the tensions inherent in the interplay of unity and diversity have come to full expression. It explores early arguments related to state and nation from the discipline of politics, cultural conflicts between Native-Americans and European settlers from the disciplines of history and literature, persistent issues of race relation from the disciplines of philosophy and Black studies, treatment of immigrant populations from the disciplines of literature and sociology, the long struggle for gender equality from the disciplines of history and women’s studies, and arguments pertaining to religious identity and separation of church and state from the disciplines of religious studies and politics.
 

ENG 102, The Rhetoric of Analysis & Argumentation, Honors   (3 Hours Credit)

ENG 102 H section B 

TH 8:00 – 9:15                                   Dr. Tina Bucher  

Course meets these requirements:  

  • An HON 250 course (3 of 9 elective required hours for all Honors students)  
  • General Education core requirement in Communication (3 of 9 hours required)  

Course description: 

 
The purpose of the course is to prepare students to become knowing and productive participants in academic, cultural, or civic discourse. Students will learn to use multiple and sustained modes of critical inquiry to build arguable perspectives within particular cultural contexts and conversations. These modes might include writing to learn, report, review, criticize, clarify, convince, persuade, or negotiate. In addition, students will be coached in the rhetorical concepts of persona, ethos & pathos, argument structure, counterargument, and logical fallacy. By the end of the course, students will be able to summarize, evaluate, and synthesize multiple sources in order develop a critical perspective and advance a thesis of their own. Students will also receive guidance in the evaluation and appropriate documentation of print and non-print sources (e.g., online databases, world wide web, film, photography, television, etc.). 
 

 

COM 203, Rhetoric and Public Address, Honors (3 Hours Credit)

COM 203 H section G        

Political Communication TH 2:00 – 3:15  Dr. R. Richardson                

Course meets these requirements:  

  • An HON 250 course (3 of 9 elective required hours for all Honors students)  
  • General Education core requirement in Communication (3 of 9 hours required)  

 Course description:  

Political Communication:  COM 203 H with an emphasis on political communication engages students in the creation, development, analysis and evaluation of public address in the political context.  The course challenges students with readings in communication theory and pragmatic political discourse from across the US political spectrum.  Rhetorical analysis of contemporary and current political campaigns provides insight into everything from a rhetoric of polarization to a rhetoric of apologia.   


COM 203, Rhetoric and Public Address, Honors (3 Hours Credit)

COM 203 H section H        

Social Justice                   TH 3:30 – 4:45  Dr. James Bunker 

Course meets these requirements:  

  • An HON 250 course (3 of 9 elective required hours for all Honors students)  
  • General Education core requirement in Communication (3 of 9 hours required)  

Course description: 

 
Social Justice:  All public discourse is, in one sense, responsible. But to whom, and for what purpose, and under what conditions? These questions guide this course into various interpretations of “social justice” and its relationship to rhetoric, public address, and civic discourse. Classical understanding will be complicated by contemporary comprehension of citizen participation and what it means to marginalize or silence voices in today’s civic discourse.  

 

Honors 250HA/PSY 385IA, Psychology of Women (3 Hours Credit)

HON 250H Section A 

Psychology of Women  MWF 12:00 - 12:50      Dr. Susan Conradsen  

Course meets these requirements:  

  • An HON 250 course (3 of 9 elective required hours for all Honors students)  
  • Counts as the psychology course requirement in the Behavioral and Social Sciences general education core (3 of 9 hours required)  
  • May count toward the major with departmental approval  

Course description:  

This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the psychological, social, emotional, and cognitive aspects of gender in our society.  In particular, the unique issues and challenges to women’s psychological well-being created by the impact of society (both direct and indirect) and culture will be addressed. Some of the specific topics we will cover include how gender identity is formed, the preponderance of sexist stereotypes, how the media influences our ideas of masculinity and femininity, the occupational and domestic challenges women face, the culture of violence against women across their lives, the experience of birth and mothering, love relationships, and other developmental events unique to women’s development such as menstruation and menopause.  Throughout the course the existence of sexism within American culture and beyond will be covered such as inequity in political representation and salaries, sex trafficking, female genital mutilation, and role expectations.  This class is a discussion oriented class.  Students take weekly quizzes, complete a group presentation on a topic of their choice, and complete five writing assignments.    

  

Honors 250HB/COM 416IA, Media Law (3 Hours Credit)

HON 250H Section B 

Media Law    MWF 10:00 - 10:50          Dr. K. Richardson  

Course meets these requirements:  

  • An HON 250 course (3 of 9 elective required hours for all Honors students)  
  • May count toward the major with departmental approval  

Course description: 

Constitutional and legislative foundations of freedom of speech and press, with special emphasis on the law of libel, privacy, censorship, access and broadcast regulation. Topics include discussion of the ways in which the interests of the state, society and individuals have been balanced in such arenas as political speech, commercial speech, sexual expression, student speech and technological change. For example, examining the changes in the freedoms or restrictions governing student speech require an examination of the purposes served by public and private K-12 educational systems; the changes in both prompted by social movements from the integration of the 1950s to the social conservative movement of the 1980s, and the changes in technologies available to students inside and outside the school environments. Honors students will be required to complete an annotated bibliography as they prepare for the major research-based essay required of all students. They will also complete a more detailed writer’s workshop report and will respond to a different writing prompt on the final exam. 

Honors 250HC/REL 359/PHI 359   Environmental Ethics          (3 Hours Credit)

HON 250H Section C 

Environmental Ethics     MWF 9:00-9:50         Dean Thomas Kennedy 


Course meets these requirements: 

  • An HON 250 course (3 of 9 elective required hours for all Honors students)  
  • General Education core requirement in Humanities -- 100 level for Religion or Philosophy (3 hrs credit)  
  • May count as one of the two free electives, outside of major/minor, required for graduation; OR, as the fifth humanities elective 

Course description:  

Seminar on the relationship between humanity and nonhuman nature. Discussion includes current biological, political and economic conditions, the role of technology and major philosophical perspectives. PR: one introductory course in REL or PHI. 

   

Honors Thesis

Register for HON 450H if you are starting your thesis.
Register for HON 451H if you completed HON 450H last semester.

To register for a thesis course, you will need an authorization form (available: http://www.berry.edu/provost/honors/page.aspx?id=7879) signed by your thesis director.  Be certain to have the other committee members’ names indicated on the form. Also obtain a reasonably detailed description of the work to be completed during the semester provided by your thesis director. Bring both the description and the signed authorization form to Dr. Brian Carroll for his signature. Take the signed authorization form to the Registrar’s window to have the course added.  (This process should be done during pre-registration.) After the course is added to Viking Web, your thesis director will need to authorize you to take the course before you can finally register for it on Viking Web. 
 


Honorization of Courses

An honors student may request to change a “regular” course within a major into an honors course. BEFORE you begin attending the course, during registration, meet with the instructor. Print and take the form with you (see Forms on the Honors web page); this form has guidelines for you and your instructor. Discuss with the faculty member your interest in receiving “honors” credit for a particular course. He or she will define the nature of the honors work to be completed. Complete your part of the form and return to Dr. Carroll. 
 

 Honorizing any course is NOT permitted after the first week of classes.  

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