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Evans School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

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Evans Hall, Room 202 Telephone: (706) 236-2297 FAX: (706) 802-6722
 

The Evans School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences offers degree programs in fine, performing and communication arts; history, languages and letters; philosophy and religion; and the social sciences — here defined as government and international studies, history, sociology and anthropology. These disciplines provide a wide range of course ­work in support of the college mission and promote the mission — educating the head, the heart and the hands — by teaching critical thinking, sound values and cultural appreciation.

The following majors are available in the Evans School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences; students majoring in these areas receive either the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Music (B.M.), as designated.

Art (B.A.) History (B.A.)
Communication (B.A.) Music (B.A., B.M.)
English (B.A.) Religion and Philosophy (B.A.)
French (B.A.) Sociology and Anthropology (B.A., B.S.)
German (B.A.) Spanish (B.A.)
Government and International Studies (B.A., B.S.) Theatre (B.A.)


The school and the college exist for the pursuit of truth; the accurate transmission of knowledge; the general well-being of society; and the personal, spiritual and intellectual development of students. Both school and college have, therefore, established teaching excellence, exemplary ethical conduct and commitment to research as priorities.

As principal custodian of liberal studies, the Evans School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences affirms effective communication, appreciation of the arts and humanities, understanding of modern society and the broader concerns of philosophy and theology as its special provinces. The school uncompromisingly pledges its administration, faculty and staff to continued activity in those pursuits.

 

Communication

Faculty: Professor McKee; Associate Professors Carroll and Frank; Instructor Peterson; Lecturer and Student Publications Advisor Kleine; Lecturer and Director of Forensics Richardson; Visiting Assistant Professor Conrad
Laughlin 101 Telephone: (706) 233-4089

A major in communication is available with concentrations in journalism, public relations and visual communication. The major allows students to become well-versed in a variety of visual communication technologies while remaining grounded in the liberal-arts tradition of communication studies. The curriculum offers students a well-rounded preparation in the theories, principles and skills needed for graduate study in mass communication and for the expanding opportunities in communication careers.

The goal of the communication major is to improve the writing, speaking and visual-communication skills of students by
 

  1. providing instruction and practice in the skills needed in modern mass media;
  2. developing an overall understanding of the field of communication, including the history and organization of media, as well as their social, cultural and economic impacts; and
  3. instilling an appreciation of communication as an integral part of a liberal-arts education.

A communication major includes at least 39 hours. Students must complete the communication core and one of the major concentrations.  Since only the Bachelor of Arts degree is offered for communication majors, all majors must complete the foreign-language requirement of that degree.

Communication majors will not be allowed to complete a minor in the same area as their major concentration. In addition, communication majors will not be allowed to minor in any communication minor whose list of courses contains more than three of the same courses required for the major core.


COMMUNICATION MAJOR: 39 hours
 
Required Communication Core:   
27 hours
COM 201 Foundations of Mass Communication
3-0-3
COM 300 Visual Rhetoric
3-0-3
COM 301 Reporting and Writing
2-2-3
COM 303 Editing
3-0-3
COM 305 Multimedia Production
2-2-3
COM 312 Contemporary Persuasion
3-0-3
COM 415WI Theories of Communication
3-0-3
COM 416WI Media Law
3-0-3
COM 450 Senior Seminar in Ethics
3-0-3


COMMUNICATION CONCENTRATIONS

Majors select only one concentration. To complete a concentration, students must complete at least nine hours from the indicated courses.

 

Journalism Concentration   at least 9 hours  
COM 306 Public-Affairs Reporting
3-0-3
COM 322 Feature Writing
3-0-3
COM 329 Introduction to Digital Communication
3-0-3
COM 331 Economics of News
3-0-3
COM 353 Photojournalism
3-0-3
COM 429 J Seminar
3-0-3
Public Relations Concentration  at least 9 hours  
COM 375 Principles of Public Relations
3-0-3
COM 380 Public Relations Writing
3-0-3
COM 385 Public Relations Cases and Campaigns
3-0-3
COM 390 Public Relations Administration
3-0-3
COM 417 Methods of Audience Analysis
3-0-3
COM 429 P Seminar
3-0-3
Visual Communication   at least 9 hours  
COM 302 Visual Media Criticism
3-0-3
COM 307 Commercial Photography and Production
3-0-3
COM 320 Programming and Distribution
3-0-3
COM 326 Scriptwriting and Copywriting
3-0-3
COM 425 Narrative Video Production
2-2-3
COM 429 V Seminar
3-0-3


Majors must complete at least three additional hours of either communication courses or a course selected from the following:  EDU 260 (2 hrs), MGT 340, ENG 300, MKT 427*, ART 350, ART 351, or FLM 210.  Majors are strongly encouraged to use COM 496 to satisfy this requirement.

*prerequisite required

 

COMMUNICATION MINORS
Public Relations Minor  21 hours  
COM 300 Visual Rhetoric
3-0-3
COM 301 Reporting and Writing
2-2-3
COM 303 Editing
3-0-3
COM 305 Multimedia Production
2-2-3
COM 375 Principles of Public Relations
3-0-3
  and two additional courses from the following:  
COM 380 Public Relations Writing
3-0-3
COM 385 Public Relations Cases and Campaigns
3-0-3
COM 390 Public Relations Administration
3-0-3
Journalism Minor  18 hours  
COM 201 Foundations of Mass Communication
3-0-3
COM 300 Visual Rhetoric 
3-0-3
COM 301 Reporting and Writing
2-2-3
COM 303 Editing
3-0-3
COM 305 Multimedia Production or 
2-2-3
COM 353 Photojournalism
3-0-3
COM 306 Public-Affairs Reporting or 
3-0-3
COM 322 Feature Writing
3-0-3
  Communication majors may not minor in journalism.  
Speech Minor   18 hours to be selected from  
COM 206 Voice and Diction Improvement
3-0-3
COM 302 Visual Media Criticism
3-0-3
COM 312 Contemporary Persuasion
3-0-3
COM 314 Oral Interpretation
3-0-3
COM 415WI Theories of Communication
3-0-3
COM 416WI Media Law
3-0-3
COM 429 Seminar in Communication
3-0-3


English, Rhetoric and Writing

Faculty: Professors Cooley, Dasher, Meek, Tenger and Trolander; Associate Professors Bucher,
Diller, Johnson, Taylor, Watkins and Whelan; Assistant Professor Mejia; Lecturers Powell and Van Cise
Evans Hall, Room 225 Telephone: (706) 368-5625

The English major introduces students to ethical, aesthetic, intellectual and cultural issues embodied in a wide variety of literary genres drawn from broad historical periods. The goal is to acquaint students with the English and American literary traditions, methods of textual analysis, the diversity of theoretical approaches to literature, and the history, structure and varieties of the English language.

A major in English requires 39 semester hours. The department offers 200-level courses to introduce students to the British, American and world literary traditions as well as methods of literary research and analysis. Courses at the 300 and 400 levels concentrate on specific historical periods, genres, minority literatures and authors, and provide opportunities for in-depth study of literary texts.

ENGLISH MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
Students must complete the requirements of the English core plus one of the major concentrations.

English Core  21 hours  
ENG 240 Introduction to Literary Studies
3-0-3
ENG 337 Western Literary Tradition
3-0-3
One 300-level course in British literature, pre-1800  
ENG 316 Medieval Literature
3-0-3
ENG 318 Renaissance Literature
3-0-3
ENG 323 Restoration and 18th-Century
Literature
3-0-3
One 300-level course in British literature, post-1800  
ENG 325 Romantic Literature
3-0-3
ENG 327 Victorian Literature
3-0-3
ENG 329 Modern British Literature
3-0-3
One 300-level course in American literature  
ENG 333WI American Romanticism and Transcendentalism
3-0-3
ENG 334WI American Realism and Naturalism
3-0-3
ENG 335WI Twentieth-Century American Literature
3-0-3
One 300-level course in multicultural literature  
ENG 331WI Contemporary Literature
3-0-3
ENG 332 Postcolonial Literature
3-0-3
ENG 339WI African American Literature
3-0-3
ENG 342 Women’s Literature
3-0-3
One 400-level “Studies” course  
ENG 418 Studies in Cinema
3-0-3
ENG 420WI Studies in Literary Criticism and Theory
3-0-3
ENG 422 Studies in Major Author(s)
3-0-3
ENG 424 Studies in Theme
3-0-3
ENG 426WI Studies in Genre
3-0-3
ENG 428 Topics in Literature and Language
3-0-3
ENG 432WI Studies in Southern Literature
3-0-3
ENG 434 Studies in Linguistics
3-0-3
 
Students must choose one of the following concentrations in order to complete the requirements for the major.
 
Literature Concentration  18 hours  
ENG 401WI Shakespeare
3-0-3
One additional 300-level course in British Literature from the following:
ENG 316 Medieval Literature
3-0-3
ENG 318 Renaissance Literature
3-0-3
ENG 323 Restoration and 18th-Century
Literature
3-0-3
ENG 325 Romantic Literature
3-0-3
ENG 327 Victorian Literature
3-0-3
ENG 329 Modern British Literature
3-0-3
One additional 300-level course in American Literature from the following:
ENG 333WI American Romanticism and
Transcendentalism
3-0-3
ENG 334WI American Realism and Naturalism
3-0-3
ENG 335WI Twentieth-Century American Literature
3-0-3
One additional “Studies” course from the following:
ENG 418 Studies in Cinema
2-2-4
ENG 420WI Studies in Literary Criticism and Theory
3-0-3
ENG 422 Studies in Major Author(s)
3-0-3
ENG 424 Studies in Theme
3-0-3
ENG 426WI Studies in Genre
3-0-3
ENG 428 Topics in Literature and Language
3-0-3
ENG 432WI Studies in Southern Literature
3-0-3
Two 3-hour English electives
6 hours
     
Secondary Education Concentration  18 hours
ENG 204 Introduction to Linguistics
3-0-3
ENG 401WI Shakespeare
3-0-3
ENG 427 Young Adult Literature
3-0-3
One course in writing from the following:
ENG 300 Writing for Online Environments
3-0-3
ENG 301 Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry
3-0-3
ENG 302 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction
3-0-3
ENG 303WI Advanced Rhetoric and Writing
3-0-3
ENG 305 Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction
3-0-3
ENG 306 Principles of Writing Pedagogy
3-0-3
Two 3-hour English electives 6 hours
     
Writing Concentration  
18 hours
ENG 301 Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry
3-0-3
ENG 302 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction
3-0-3
  And either:   
ENG 303WI Advanced Writing and Rhetoric, or
3-0-3
ENG 300 Writing for Online Environments
3-0-3
  And either:  
ENG 470 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry or 
3-0-3
ENG 471 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction
3-0-3
One additional English course in writing from the following:
ENG 303WI Advanced Writing and Rhetoric
3-0-3
ENG 300 Writing for Online Environments
3-0-3
ENG 304 Introduction to Playwriting
3-0-3
ENG 305 Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction

3-0-3
ENG 306 Principles of Writing Pedagogy
3-0-3
ENG 470 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

3-0-3
ENG 471 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction
3-0-3
ENG 490 Writer’s Tutorial
3-0-3
One 3-hour English elective 3 hours

ENGLISH MINOR: 18 hours


A minor in English requires two courses at the 200 level and 12 additional hours, of which at least nine hours must be taken at the 300 and/or 400 level.
 


WRITING MINOR: 18 hours
The Writing Minor consists of 18 hours taken from the following courses:    
ENG 300 Writing for Online Environments
3-0-3
ENG 301 Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry
3-0-3
ENG 302 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction
3-0-3
ENG 303WI Advanced Rhetoric and Writing
3-0-3
ENG 304 Introduction to Playwriting
3-0-3
ENG 305 Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction
3-0-3
ENG 306 Principles of Writing Pedagogy
3-0-3
ENG 470 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry
3-0-3
ENG 471 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction
3-0-3
ENG 490 Writer’s Tutorial
3-0-3
ENG 200 Rhetoric and Writing Practicum
1 to 3 hours
COM 301 Writing for the Mass Media
3-0-3
COM 322 Feature Writing
3-0-3
COM 324 Broadcast Writing
3-0-3


Students who minor in writing but who also want to major in English may do so only if they choose either the Literature or Secondary Education Concentrations.

FIRST-YEAR PROGRAM IN RHETORIC AND WRITING
 

Berry College has made a commitment to educate students to achieve excellence in thinking and writing. Because writing is fundamental to discovery and learning, to analysis and communication, the program aims to improve students’ ability to reason, acquire and assimilate knowledge and articulate what they have learned. The courses focus on developing students’ analytical and critical-thinking skills to enable them to generate ideas through the prewriting, drafting and revision stages of essay development. The goal is to create a community of writers who can participate in the significant political, ethical and cultural debates of our time and who are appreciative of the value, power and pleasure of words. Matriculated students may not complete ENG 101 or 102 as transient students elsewhere.

Students are required to take these courses: 

ENG 101 First-Year Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing
3-0-3
ENG 102 First-Year Seminar in Critical Inquiry and Writing
3-0-3

Students may exempt ENG 101 through Advanced Placement Tests. Students who do exempt ENG 101 should enroll in ENG 102 during their first term. All students are encouraged to enroll in the appropriate ENG course during their first term.

Rhetoric and Writing Practicum (ENG 200 for 1 to 3 credit hours) is by permission of instructor only and is designed for students who work in Berry’s Writing Center.

Fine Arts


Faculty: Professors Davis, Mew and Pethel; Associate Professors Adams, Boy, Bristow, Countryman, Garrido, Lykins and Troy; Assistant Professors Carlisle and Smith; Lecturers Baker, Elkins, Musselwhite and Schul; Artist-in-Residence Hayes

 

Art

Moon Building, Room 104 Telephone: (706) 233-4089, 238-5841 or 290-2692

The major in art leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree is available in three concentrations: studio art, art history and art education. Each program of study is designed to help students better understand aesthetic values through involvement in the creative-art process.

The curriculum leading to a concentration in studio art or art history requires a minimum of 39 semester hours (including the 24-hour art core). ART 450, Senior Thesis, is required of all B.A. candidates electing a concentration in studio art or art history. Studio candidates prepare a one-person exhibition for their thesis; students in art history prepare a written thesis. Berry College reserves the right to select and retain a work of art from the senior-thesis show and to make that work of art a part of the permanent student-art collection at the college.

Teacher certification is available in art. Students wishing to pursue teacher certification should minor in education and select a member of the education faculty to serve as a second advisor.

The curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Arts (art-education concentration) requires a minimum of 39 semester hours (including the 24-hour art core) and is planned to meet requirements of the State of Georgia for preschool through 12th-grade teacher certification in art. Students pursuing this option must seek the advice of the Berry College Charter School of Education and Human Sciences. The students must take the professional-education sequence (including ART 304) and satisfy requirements of the Georgia Department of Education for course work in specific art-content areas.

All B.A. majors in the department of art are required to complete the foreign-language requirement for that degree.

Affiliated with the art program is the Moon Gallery, which houses student exhibitions and exhibitions by professional artists. Each year artists of national and international stature visiting the campus enrich the program for all students pursuing art courses.

 

ART MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 39 hours (B.A. studio-art, art-history concentration, or art-education concentration)
Art Core  21 to 24 hours  
Students must take the following:  
ART 102 Two-Dimensional Design
2-2-3
ART 201 Survey of Art I
3-0-3
ART 202 Survey of Art II
3-0-3
ART 220 Beginning Drawing
2-2-3
ART 284 Hand Building Clay
2-2-3
ART 405WI Modern Art Seminar
3-0-3
ART 410WI Early 20th-Century Art
3-0-3
Students concentrating in studio art and art history take ART 450 Senior Thesis 0-10-3.
Studio-Art Concentration  15 hours  
Students select 15 hours from the following courses:
ART 321 Figure Drawing
2-2-3
ART 327 Web Design I
3-0-3
ART 350 Light Media
2-2-3
ART 351 Digital Imaging
2-2-3
ART 379 Throwing Clay
2-2-3
ART 382 Printmaking
2-2-3
ART 384 Beginning Painting
2-2-3
ART 385 Intermediate Printmaking
2-2-3
ART 386 Intermediate Painting
2-2-3
ART 388 Advanced Painting
2-2-3
ART 389 Advanced Clay
2-2-3
ART 415 Advanced Studio Problems
2-2-3
ART 496 Academic Internship
3 to 12 hours
ART 498 Directed Study
1 to 3 hours
Art-Education Concentration  18 hours  
Students take the following courses:
ART 304 Art Education for Early Childhood
and Middle Grades
2-2-3
ART 321 Figure Drawing
2-2-3
ART 350 Light Media
2-2-3
ART 379 Throwing Clay
2-2-3
ART 382 Printmaking
2-2-3
ART 384 Beginning Painting
2-2-3



Art-education students are required to have an education faculty member as their secondary advisor. In addition to the art concentration, they take the professional-education sequence (education minor) listed in the catalog under the Charter School of Education and Human Sciences section, Minors and Required Courses, Preschool-12.

 

Required education courses 
27 hours
EDU 102 Orientation to Teacher Education
1-0-1
EDU 206 Foundations of Education and
Psychology(Grades 4-12)
3-2-4
EDU 222 Exploration in Diverse Cultures
1-4-3
EDU 380 Curriculum and Methods for
Secondary Education
3-2-4
EDU 489 Student Teaching I
2 hours
EDU 490 Professional Seminar
1-0-1
EDU 499 Student Teaching II
9 hours
PSY 423 Introduction to Exceptional Children and
Youth
1-0-1
PSY 424 Psychology and Education of Exceptional
Children and Youth
2-0-2


It is required that art-education majors add the course work necessary for the ESOL endorsement to their certification: ENG 204 Introduction to Linguistics and EDU 495 Teaching of English as a Second Language: Methods and Materials.

 

Art History Concentration  15 hours  
Students select 15 hours from the following courses:
ART 230 Irish Art Seminar 3-0-3
ART 301 The Renaissance in Italy 1-0-1
ART 308 Ancient Greek and Roman Art 3-0-3
ART 320WI Renaissance Art 3-0-3
ART 325 Baroque and Rococo Art 3-0-3
ART 330WI Pre-Columbian and Latin American Art 3-0-3
ART 408WI Nineteenth-Century Art 3-0-3
ART 420 Art Theory and Criticism 3-0-3
ART 413WI Women and Art 3-0-3
ART 496 Academic Internship 3 to 12 hours
ART 498 Directed Study 1 to 3 hours


Art Minor Requirements

A minor in art consists of 21 semester hours. At least 9 semester hours must be in courses numbered 300 or above. The following courses totaling 12 hours are required:

 

ART 102 Two-Dimensional Design 2-2-3
ART 201 Survey of Art I or   
ART 202 Survey of Art II 3-0-3
ART 220 Beginning Drawing 2-2-3
Any 300- or 400-level art history course 3-0-3


Select an additional 9 hours of art courses, with at least two at the 300 level or above.

 

Music

Ford, Room 215 Telephone: (706) 236-2289; Fax: (706) 238-7874

The mission of the Berry College music program is to educate students in the discipline of music and to provide quality musical experiences for all Berry students. It seeks to prepare students for professional careers in music and to provide all interested students and community members with opportunities to appreciate, enjoy and participate in musical performances.

Students are admitted to the music program by audition. Financial aid is available.

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires 12 hours in a foreign language.

The Bachelor of Music degree offers majors in music education and music with elective studies in business. Students majoring in music education are required to take the professional-education sequence, and those majoring in music with elective studies in business must complete the required courses in business.

All music majors are required to participate in at least one major performing group each semester of enrollment.

Specific degree requirements in music are as follows.

Core Courses for all Music degrees 27 hours
 

Music Theory  17 hours  
MUS 101 Elementary Theory
3-0-3
MUS 102 Elementary Theory
3-0-3
MUS 201 Intermediate Theory
3-0-3
MUS 202 Intermediate Theory
3-0-3
MUS 301 Form and Analysis
2-0-2
MUS 302 Composition and Arranging
3-0-3
*Music History and Literature  10 hours  
MUS 347 Literature and History of Music I
2-0-2
MUS 348WI Literature and History of Music II
3-0-3
MUS 349WI Literature and History of Music III
3-0-3
MUS 355 World Music
2-0-2


*Three hours of music history may be used to satisfy the fine-arts requirement, and three hours of either 348WI or 349WI may be counted toward the humanities elective requirement in the general-education requirement for graduation for all music degrees.

Bachelor of Arts
 

Major in Music    49 total hours
Music Core     27 hours
Applied Music Lessons     14 hours (2 per semester for 7 semesters)
Electives    8 hours (may be combined with outside minor or additional applied lessons)
General and/or Music Electives    10 hours
Foreign Language, single concentration   12 hours

Bachelor of Music
MAJOR IN MUSIC WITH ELECTIVE STUDIES IN BUSINESS

60 total hours in music including music core courses
 

Music Core    27 hours
Music Industry (MUS 390)   2 hours
Academic Internship (MUS 496)   6 hours
Applied Music Lessons    14 hours (2 per semester for 7 semesters)
Special Music Courses    11 hours


For students pursuing two applied areas, 11 hours will be selected with the approval of the department chair.
 

Instrumental-major track   
Hours
MUS 190 (instrumental training)
2
MUS 196-197, 296-297 (piano)
4
MUS 328 or 329 (conducting)
2
Electives  
3
Piano-major track     
MUS 190 (instrumental training)
2
MUS 328 or 329 (conducting)
2
†MUS 450 (piano literature)
3
Electives  
4
  †Offered every other year  
Voice-major track     
MUS 190 (instrumental training)
2
MUS 196-197, 296-297 (piano)
4
MUS 328 or 329 (conducting)
3
Electives  

3


Business Courses 24 hours (minor in business)
 

Business Minor Pre-core Courses
9 hours
ACC 201 Principles of Financial Accounting
3-0-3
BUS 107 Business-Information Management
3-0-3
ECO 110 Principles of Economics I (general education)
3-0-3
Required Business Minor Core Courses
9 hours
FIN 301 Principles of Finance
3-0-3
MGT 301 Principles of Management
3-0-3
MKT 301 Principles of Marketing
3-0-3
Two courses selected from the following:
6 hours
BUS 210 Legal Environment of Business
3-0-3
BUS 308 Ethical Issues in Business
3-0-3
BUS 316WI Information Systems
3-0-3
FIN 310 Investments
3-0-3
MGT 302WI Organizational Behavior
3-0-3
MGT 340 Management of Small Business
3-0-3
MGT 345 Management of Human Resources
3-0-3
MKT 322 Consumer Behavior
3-0-3
MKT 326 Personal Selling
3-0-3


Students must meet the prerequisites of the individual business courses.

 

Major in Music Education

60 total hours in music including music core courses

 

Music Core   27 hours
Applied Music Lessons   14 hours (2 per semester for 7 semesters)
Special Music Courses   19 hours

For students pursuing two applied areas, 19 hours will be selected with the approval of the department chair.

 

Instrumental-major track   
Hours
MUS 191/192/193/194 (instrumental methods)
8
MUS 195 (voice class)
1
MUS 196-19, 296-297 (piano)
4
MUS 328 and 329 (conducting)
4
†MUS 422 (band literature)
2
Piano-major track     
MUS 190 (instrumental training)
2
MUS 195 (voice class)
1
MUS 328 and 329 (conducting)
4
†MUS 439 (choral literature)
3
†MUS 447 (piano methods)
3
†MUS 450 (piano literature)
3
Electives  
3
Voice-major track     
MUS 190 (instrumental training)
2
MUS 196-197, 296-297 (piano)
4
MUS 328 and 329 (conducting)
4
†MUS 439 (choral literature)
3
†MUS 444 (vocal literature)
3
Electives  
3
  †Offered every other year  
Required Education Courses   
28 hours
EDU 102 Orientation to Teacher Education
1-0-1
EDU 206 Foundations of Education and Psychology
(Grades 4-12; includes field experience)
3-2-4
EDU 222 Exploration in Diverse Cultures
1-4-3
EDU 489 Student Teaching I

2 hours
EDU 490 Professional Seminar
1 hour
EDU 499 Student Teaching II
9 hours
MUS 305 Music Curriculum (includes field experience)
2-2-3
MUS 402 Music Education
2-0-2

PSY 423
Introduction to Exceptional Children
and Youth
1-0-1
PSY 424 Psychology and Education of Exceptional
Children and Youth
2-0-2


NOTE: For state certification in music, field experiences at elementary, middle-grades and secondary levels are required. Students should do field experience for EDU 206 and MUS 305 in an area different from that of student teaching. It is highly recommended that music-education majors add the course work necessary for the ESOL endorsement to their certification: ENG 204 Introduction to Linguistics and EDU 495 Teaching of English as a Second Language: Methods and Materials.
 


MUSIC MINOR 20 hours


A music minor will consist of at least 20 semester hours in music subjects to be approved in advance by a music advisor, at least nine hours of which must not be used to satisfy other general-education or major requirements. Applied, historical, theoretical and performance areas are included in this program. Music minors are required to participate in either Symphonic Band (MUS 131), Women’s Ensemble (MUS 115) or Concert Choir (MUS 111) for a minimum of four semesters. MUS 131, MUS 115 and MUS 111 may be repeated for credit.
 

Required courses    
10 hours
MUS 101 Elementary Theory
3-0-3
MUS 102 Elementary Theory
3-0-3
MUS 247 Introduction to Music History and
Related Literature
2-0-2
MUS 328 Conducting
2-0-2
Applied Lessons  4 hours (minor credit)  
Special Courses  6 hours selected from  
MUS 190 Instrumental Training
2-0-2
MUS 195 Voice Class
1-0-1
MUS 196/197 Class Piano
2-0-1
MUS 320 Musical Theatre
3-0-3
MUS 301 Form and Analysis
2-0-2
MUS 302 Composition and Arranging
3-0-3
MUS 346 Women in Music
3-0-3
MUS 348WI Literature and History of Music II or   
MUS 349WI Literature and History of Music III
3-0-3
MUS 355 World Music
2-0-2


APPLIED MUSIC REQUIREMENTS

For all music majors, two hours of credit per semester represent a one-hour-length lesson per week. A one-hour-length lesson per week may receive three hours’ credit with permission of the instructor. Lessons for minor credit begin with 0. Individual practice time is required for lessons. A senior recital is required at the 400 level. For majors in music education and music with elective studies in business, a half-hour-length recital is required. For the Bachelor of Arts with a major in music, performance concentration, a 50-minute recital is required.

Major credit is established through individual examinations, called juries, held at the close of each semester by a committee of the music faculty and is based on performance standards and satisfactory progress.

In all applied music subjects, a fee for individual lessons is charged in addition to regular tuition. This fee is $90 for a half-hour lesson per week (minor credit) and $175 for a one-hour lesson per week.

Lessons for non-majors
One to two hours of credit each semester may be earned.
051-052-053, etc. Winds and Percussion
061-062-063, etc. Piano
071-072-073, etc. Voice
081-082-083, etc. Guitar and Strings
Lessons for majors
One to three hours of credit each semester may be earned.
151-452 Winds and Percussion
161-462 Piano
171-472 Voice
181-482 Guitar and Strings

 

COLLEGE MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

All music majors are required to participate in either the college Concert Choir (MUS 111) or the Symphonic Band (MUS 131) throughout their period of study; music minors must participate for four semesters.

Students may repeat these courses for credit or may elect to participate through the zero-credit option to avoid overload charges.

Participation in the Berry Singers (MUS 121) is by audition. Students are encouraged to participate in Jazz Ensemble (MUS 141) and Chamber Music (MUS 132). Students on financial aid through music may be required to perform with these ensembles.

 

Theatre

Blackstone Hall Room 200 Telephone (706) 236-2258

The theatre department at Berry College champions the liberal-arts ideal. The department offers an intensive program designed to provide students with the academic and professional foundation essential to success in the field. The course of study includes offerings in performance (including dance), design and technical theatre, theatre history and criticism. Theatre and dance training in the liberal-arts tradition entails the complementary activities of artistry and intellectual development. Since only the Bachelor of Arts degree is offered for theatre majors, all majors must complete the foreign-language requirement of that degree. Students master skills in all aspects of theatre as art, business and education. The curriculum is designed to immerse students in the scholarship as well as the practicalities of theatre. Frequent productions allow students to apply skills they learn in class. Internship opportunities, independent study and special seminars are offered by the faculty as well as guest artists and scholars.

The program is committed to
 

  1. broadening the consciousness of student artists and playgoers;
  2. preserving and fostering cultural achievements and aesthetic sensibility;
  3. developing the artistic maturity of students by stressing the virtues of collaboration, discipline, humility and tolerance;
  4. providing opportunities for self-expression and creative fulfillment; and
  5. collaborating with other artists and scholars in community, academic and professional settings.

The goals of the theatre major are

  1. to acquaint students with the primary assumptions and critical principles of theatre-arts theory and practice;
  2. to promote an understanding of the roles and contributions of the several collaborative artists responsible for theatre activity;
  3. to promote a reading and performing knowledge of dramatic literature;
  4. to develop students’ appreciation of how the various components of theatre are orchestrated to produce an aesthetically satisfying experience and insight into the human condition;
  5. to familiarize the student with the historical heritage of theatre; and
  6. to generate new perceptions and skills relevant to an appreciation and practice of dramatic arts.
THEATRE MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 42 hours
Required Theatre Core   
24 hours
THE 200 Theatre Practicum
3 hours
THE 208 Basics of Acting
2-2-3
THE 215 Introduction to Theatre
3-0-3
THE 221 Stagecraft
2-2-3
THE 261 Costuming and Makeup
2-2-3
THE 322WI Script Interpretation
3-0-3
THE 341WI History of Theatre
3-0-3
THE 450 Senior Project
3-0-3


Additional Courses Required

In addition to the theatre core, the theatre major must also take at least two courses from each of the three areas of theatre study listed below.

Theatre majors should not enroll in THE 201 Theatre Appreciation, a general-education course for non-majors only.

 

History/Criticism     
THE 304WI Introduction to Playwriting
3-0-3
THE 323 Modern and Contemporary Theatre
3-0-3
THE 401WI Shakespeare
3-0-3
Performance     
THE 207 Movement for the Stage
3-0-3
THE 209 Basics of Directing
2-2-3
THE 306 Modern Dance
3-0-3
THE 307 Choreography
3-0-3
THE 308 Intermediate Acting
2-2-3
THE 309 Advanced Directing
2-2-3
Technical/Design     
THE 362 Period Style
3-0-3
THE 363 Costume Design
2-2-3
THE 365 Stage Design
2-2-3

Under no circumstances should any student enroll in both THE 201 Theatre Appreciation and THE 215 Introduction to Theatre. Undecided students with a strong interest in theatre should enroll in THE 215 and fulfill their fine-arts requirement with either ART 201, ART 202 or MUS 215.
 


THEATRE MINOR REQUIREMENTS 21 hours
THE 200 Theatre Practicum
3 hours
THE 208 Basics of Acting
2-2-3
THE 215 Introduction to Theatre
3-0-3
THE 221 Stagecraft or   
THE 261 Costuming and Makeup
2-2-3
THE 322 Script Interpretation
3-0-3
THE 341 History of Theatre
3-0-3
and one elective course.


Under no circumstances should students enroll in both THE 201 Theatre Appreciation and THE 215 Introduction to Theatre. Undecided students with a strong interest in theatre should enroll in THE 215 and fulfill their fine-arts requirement with either ART 201, ART 202 or MUS 215.


 

Dance Minor Requirements 
21 hours
Required Courses   
16 hours
HPE 144 Dance Improvisation
0-2-1
HPE 306 Survey of Rhythm and Dance
3-0-3
THE 170 Jazz and Tap Dance
2-0-2
THE 202 Dance Troupe
*0-3-1
THE 208 Basics of Acting
2-2-3
THE 306 Modern Dance
**3-0-3
THE 307 Choreography
**3-0-3
Choose five hours from:
HPE 123 Ballroom I
0-2-1
HPE 143 Ballroom II
0-2-1
HPE 308 Children’s Creative Dance
3-0-3
MUS 215 Music Appreciation
3-0-3
MUS 355 World Music
2-0-2
THE 207 Movement for the Stage
3-0-3
THE 261 Costuming and Make-up
2-2-3

*Must be completed a minimum of two times
**Theatre majors with a performance emphasis seeking a dance minor may not use these courses as part of the major.

 

Foreign Languages

Faculty: Nichols Professor Grégoire; Associate Professors Anton, Corry, Llorente and Tate;
Assistant Professor Slade
Evans Hall, Room 102 Telephone: (706) 236-2279; Fax: (706) 236-5091

The Department of Foreign Languages offers a variety of language, literature and cultural courses in French, German, and Spanish. The course of instruction emphasizes the development of communication skills.  Majors and minors include courses in the analysis of cultural and literary works, as well as linguistic proficiency in professional areas such as business and education.  Foreign language courses are open to all students as electives.

Foreign Language Placement Policy

Placement into Foreign Language classes is based upon Berry College placement test scores, previous experience with the language and, in some cases, individual consultation with Foreign Language faculty.  All students who plan to enroll in a Foreign Language course are required to take the Berry College Foreign Language Placement Exam if they have taken any courses in that language in high school.  Students will not be allowed to take a course below the indicated placement determined by the department.   A student may petition the Chair of the Department of Foreign Languages to be enrolled in a course other than that initially indicated. Such a determination will be made after a more detailed evaluation of speaking, listening, reading and writing proficiency, which will be conducted by a Foreign Language faculty member.
 

Foreign Language Requirements for Students Earning a Bachelor of Arts Degree (non Foreign Language majors)

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts degree at Berry College must demonstrate intermediate-level ability in a modern foreign language.  Students with previous experience in French, German, or Spanish will demonstrate proficiency in the following ways:

  1. Successful completion of the 200-level course in the foreign language
  2. Proficiency Testing
    1. Testing out of the introductory language classes
      1. The Department of Foreign Languages Placement Exam determines the class level at which students should begin their foreign language study. (Students who have completed 2 years of high school Spanish will not be placed in SPA 101.)
      2. Those students who have taken Advanced Placement courses in high school and scored a grade of 4 on the AP foreign language test will receive 4 credit hours for the 101 course. With a score of 5 on the AP test, students receive 8 credit hours for the 101 and 102 courses.
       
    2. Students who test out of both 101 and 102 (through either the Placement Exam or AP testing) begin their foreign language study at the 200-level course.

       
     
Foreign Language Requirements for Students Earning a Bachelor of Arts Degree (Foreign Language majors)

Majors in one of the foreign languages will take two additional courses of at least three credits each in a second foreign language (majors who can provide satisfactory evidence of competence in a second foreign language may appeal to the chair to have one or both of these courses waived), or three courses in the humanities approved by the major department, excluding courses counted toward the general-education requirements or additional courses in the major. Foreign language majors who complete a second major and/or an education minor are exempt from this requirement.

Study Abroad

Students who are majors or minors in a foreign language are strongly encouraged to participate in one or more of our study-abroad programs in France, Germany, Costa Rica, Mexico, Argentina and Spain.

FRENCH MAJOR: 22 hrs. at the 300-level and above
Required Courses:   
Intermediate-level ability in French demonstrated by satisfactory completion of FRE 200 or by proficiency testing and
FRE 301 Advanced French Conversation or 
3-1-3
FRE 303 Introduction to French and Francophone
Literature
3-0-3
FRE 302 Advanced French Composition
3-0-3
FRE 401WI French Literature Prior to 1800
3-0-3
FRE 402WI French Literature of the 19th and
20th Centuries
3-0-3
FRE 406 Senior Project
1-0-1
Plus 9 hours of FRE electives, with at least 3 hours selected from 400 level courses.  


GERMAN MAJOR: 21 hrs. at the 300-level and above

Required Courses:   
Intermediate-level ability in German demonstrated by satisfactory completion of GER 200 or by proficiency testing and
GER 301WI Communication, Interpretation and Cultural Awareness I (advanced) or 
3-1-3
GER 302WI Communication, Interpretation and Cultural Awareness II (advanced) or 
3-1-3
GER 303 Introduction to Major Works and Authors in German Literature
3-0-3
Plus 18 hours of GER electives, with at least nine hours selected from 400 level courses.  

SPANISH MAJOR: 27 hrs. at the 300-level and above

Required Courses:   

Intermediate-level ability in Spanish demonstrated by satisfactory completion of SPA 200 or by proficiency testing and

SPA 300 Spanish in Context
3-1-3
SPA 301 Advanced Spanish Conversation or 
3-1-3
SPA 324 Hispanic Culture
3-0-3
SPA 302WI Advanced Spanish Composition or 
3-0-3
SPA 307 Advanced Spanish Grammar
3-0-3
SPA 310 Survey of Peninsular Spanish Literature or 
3-0-3
SPA 311 Survey of Spanish-American Literature
3-0-3
SPA 450 Senior Project
3-0-3


Majors who study abroad may use one of the 300-or 400- level classes they take abroad to fulfill the SPA 450: Senior Project requirement.

Of the remaining 12 hours of electives, nine are to be selected on the 400 level.  Students may receive a maximum of eight credit hours based on their score on the placement test.  If they are placed in 102 by examination, they may receive four credit hours for 101.  If they are placed in 200 by examination, they may receive four credit hours for 101 and another four credit hours for 102.

 

Foreign-Language Teacher Certification

 Teacher certification is available when majoring in a foreign language. Students wishing to pursue teacher certification should minor in education and select a member of the education faculty to serve as a second advisor.

The P-12 teaching certification in a foreign language requires the completion of one of the majors described above in addition to the completion of a minor in education including FLA 400. The education minor and FLA 400 will not count as part of the 22-hour (FRE), 21-hour (GER), or 27-hour  (SPA) major requirements. SPA 307 is required as part of the 39-hour major requirements for teacher-education students in Spanish. Those seeking teaching certification must apply for acceptance in the teacher-education program and complete successfully, the GACE examination in the language studied. A study-abroad experience is considered essential for those wishing to teach a foreign language.
 

FOREIGN-LANGUAGE MINOR

French Minor Requirements:  

To earn a minor in French, a student must demonstrate intermediate-level ability in French by satisfactory completion of FRE 200 or by proficiency testing and complete 9 hours at or above the 300 level.

German Minor Requirements:  

To earn a minor in German, a student must demonstrate intermediate-level ability in German by satisfactory completion of GER 200 or by proficiency testing and complete 9 hours at or above the 300 level.

Spanish Minor Requirements:  

To earn a minor in Spanish, a student must demonstrate intermediate-level ability in Spanish by satisfactory completion of SPA 200 or by proficiency testing, and complete SPA 300 and 9 additional hours at or above the 300 level.


 

Government and International Studies

Faculty: Dana Professor Lawler, Gund Professor Singh; Associate Professors Bailey, Hickman and Taylor; Assistant Professor Sands
Evans Hall, Room 109B Telephone: (706) 236-2222

The curricula of the department of government and international studies offer opportunities for students to develop a sophisticated understanding of domestic and international political ideas, events, institutions and behavior. Majors in government and international studies become proficient in bodies of knowledge involving order, justice, ethics, leadership, representation, organization, competition and cooperation. The curricula prepare students for careers in government, law, international business and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and college-level teaching and research.

 

Government

Government majors may pursue either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree. It is strongly recommended that majors enroll in the methods course (GOV 393WI) in their sophomore or junior year and that MAT 111 be taken before enrolling in GOV 393WI. Government majors pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree are required to take Elementary Statistics (MAT 111), plus an additional course in computer science, ­mathematics or economics. Note that government majors pursuing the Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the foreign-language requirement for that degree. Specific departmental requirements for government majors and minors in addition to the general-education requirements are listed below.
 


GOVERNMENT MAJOR: 39 hours
Majors must complete the following courses:   
GOV 207 Contemporary World Issues 3-0-3
GOV 211 American National Government 3-0-3
GOV 217 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3-0-3
GOV 318 Ancient Political Philosophy 3-0-3
GOV 321WI International Relations 3-0-3
GOV 393WI Social-Science Research Methods 3-0-3
GOV 406 Senior Project 3-0-3
  plus 18 hours of government electives  
GOVERNMENT MINOR: 18 hours
Minors must complete the following courses:    
GOV 207 Contemporary World Issues or   
GOV 211 American National Government 3-0-3
GOV 217 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3-0-3
GOV 321WI International Relations or   
GOV 318 Ancient Political Philosophy 3-0-3
  plus 9 hours of government electives  

Students must meet residency requirements in both major and minor as listed on page 42, item 7.

Teacher certification is available in government. Students wishing to pursue teacher certification should minor in education and select a member of the education faculty to serve as a second advisor.

 

International Studies

International Studies is a flexible major, offered only as a Bachelor of Arts degree program, that prepares students for careers in government, law, international business and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and college-level teaching. In addition, all international studies majors are encouraged to participate in the college’s study-abroad program. Majors in international studies may not claim a minor in any of the fields, except foreign language, taken to satisfy the major requirements.

Students majoring in international studies are required to take Elementary Statistics (MAT 111). It is strongly recommended that MAT 111 be taken prior to enrolling in the methods course (GOV 393WI). A minor in international studies is available to all students, provided that students complete the minimum foreign-language requirement for the B.A. degree. Specific departmental requirements for international-studies majors and minors in addition to the general-education requirements are listed below.
 


INTERNATIONAL STUDIES MAJOR: 39 hours

Majors must complete 24 hours in International Relations Core:   
GOV 207 Contemporary World Issues
3-0-3
GOV 211 American National Government 3-0-3
GOV 217 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3-0-3
GOV 319 Modern Political Philosophy
3-0-3
GOV 321WI International Relations
3-0-3
GOV 393WI Social-Science Research Methods
3-0-3
GOV 406 Senior Project
3-0-3
GOV 435WI Foreign-Policy Analysis
3-0-3
and complete 15 credit hours chosen from: 
GOV 231 Model United Nations
1 to 3 hours
GOV 320 Comparative Politics of Western Europe
3-0-3
GOV 323 Revolution and Political Violence
3-0-3
GOV 333 American Political Development or 
3-0-3
GOV 338WI Presidency and Congress
3-0-3
GOV 339WI Politics and History of Russia
3-0-3
GOV 343WI Comparative Politics of South Asia
3-0-3
GOV 344WI Politics and History of East Asia
3-0-3
GOV 358 Politics of Latin America
3-0-3
GOV 410 Conflict and Cooperation in World Politics
3-0-3
GOV 411 International Law and Organizations
3-0-3
GOV 421 International Relations Theory
3-0-3
HIS 445 History of American Diplomacy
3-0-3


INTERNATIONAL STUDIES MINOR
Required Courses: 
18 hours
GOV 207 Contemporary World Issues
3-0-3
GOV 217 Introduction to Comparative Politics
3-0-3
GOV 321WI International Relations
3-0-3
  plus three upper-division electives (9 hours) from any one of the four concentrations and 12 hours (101, 102, 200) in one foreign language.  

History

Faculty: Professor Atkins; Associate Professors Marvin and Snider; Assistant Professor
Stanard
Evans Hall, Room 109B Telephone: (706) 236-2222

A major in history is useful to students interested in a career in law, education, writing, the ministry, business, government, library and archival work, or historic restoration. The study of history is also of value to those who are anxious to receive a liberal-arts background to pursue other career options. A wide variety of courses in American, European and world history will allow each student to shape his or her intellectual development and to enhance various critical and creative thinking skills necessary for personal and professional success.
 


HISTORY MAJOR: 36 hours
Required History Courses:     
HIS 154 World History to 1550
3-0-3
HIS 155 World History Since 1550
3-0-3
HIS 205 American History to 1877
3-0-3
HIS 206 American History Since 1877
3-0-3
HIS 491WI Historiography
3-0-3


plus an additional 21 hours of history electives, including 9 hours of upper-division (300-400 level) courses in American history, and 9 hours of upper-division courses in European and/or world history.

Teacher certification is available in history. Students wishing to pursue teacher certification should minor in education and select a member of the education faculty to serve as a second advisor.

History majors who desire teacher certification must complete the professional education sequence and earn credit for at least one upper-division course that emphasizes non-Western history, plus 12 additional hours chosen from anthropology, economics, government and international studies, psychology and sociology. These courses may also be used to satisfy up to three general-education courses.

The Bachelor of Arts degree is awarded to students majoring in history upon completion of all degree requirements.
 


HISTORY MINOR: 18 hours

Students must complete at least two of the following:   
HIS 154 World History to 1550
3-0-3
HIS 155 World History Since 1550
3-0-3
HIS 205 American History to 1877
3-0-3
HIS 206 American History Since 1877
3-0-3


plus 12 hours of history electives, at least nine hours of which must be at the 300-400 level.

 

Interdisciplinary Minors and Certificate Program

Several interdisciplinary minors are available through the Evans School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences and in collaboration with the other schools at Berry College. (See also visual communication minor in the communication department and the writing minor in the English department.)

A certificate in Latin American and Caribbean studies is also available. Courses involved in obtaining this certificate are designed to help provide an undergraduate, interdisciplinary background for students interested in careers or further study that may involve the peoples and societies of Latin America and the Caribbean.

 

Film Studies Minor

Faculty: Professor Trolander; Associate Professors Anton, Bucher and Countryman;
Assistant Professor Mejia
Evans 230 Telephone: (706) 233-4076

The minor in film is interdisciplinary and is not administered through a specific academic department. Its faculty are drawn from disciplines throughout the humanities, the arts and the social sciences. The minor has been designed to reflect the recent explosion of scholarly interest in film, as well as the diverse cultural responses to the medium. While the aesthetic appreciation of the medium is the minor’s point of departure, the student can expect to take courses emphasizing film as a document of social history or as a research tool for examining differences in culture.

Students in film will acquire skills for its formal and semiotic analysis, as well as an appreciation for its incredibly rich historical development. Minors will also come to see cinema as a significant historical force in its own right. Students can expect to take courses that range from historical surveys to surveys of particular film genres, from courses that focus on a specific director to courses in cinematic adaptation of literary genres.

The minor in film is appropriate for anyone wishing to gain an in-depth appreciation of a medium that pervades the modern psyche and popular imagination. It is particularly useful to those students whose major interests are in film or video production, media studies, English or foreign literatures, theatre, music and history. Directed readings that treat specific directors, national cinemas, cinematic genres or special projects can be arranged.

Students who initiate course work in their sophomore year can complete the minor by graduation.  Students interested in the minor should contact one of the faculty listed above.
 


FILM STUDIES MINOR: 18 hours
FLM 210 Introduction to Film
3-0-3
FLM 301 Film as History
3-0-3
FLM 350 Topics in the History of Film
3-0-3
FLM 418 Special Topics in Film
3-0-3

Students minoring in film must also complete an additional six hours in FLM 350 and/or FLM 418.

 

Legal Studies Minor

Faculty: Professor Lawler; Associate Professors Bailey, Carroll, Frank, Papazian and
Stephenson; Assistant Professor Baker
Green Hall 413 Telephone: (706) 238-7878

The Legal Studies minor is an interdisciplinary curriculum focusing on law and the American legal system. Courses available include broad overviews of business and constitutional law, surveys of the law’s economic efficiency and philosophical underpinnings, and intensive examinations of specific legal areas.

Students interested in the minor should consult with one of the faculty members. Careful planning of course selection is necessary, as some courses are offered only once every two years.
 


LEGAL STUDIES MINOR: 18 hours

Choose six courses from the following:   
BUS 210 Legal Environment of Business
3-0-3
BUS 411 Advanced Business Law
3-0-3
COM 416WI Mass Communication Law
3-0-3
ECO 460 Economic Analysis of Law
3-0-3
GOV 319 Modern Political Philosophy
3-0-3
GOV/SOC/WNS 387 Gender, Law and Society
3-0-3
GOV 411 International Law and Organizations
3-0-3
GOV 417 Constitutional Law: American Political
Institutions
3-0-3
GOV 418 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties and
Civil Rights
3-0-3
PHI 350 Philosophy of Law
3-0-3
REL 330 Church and State
3-0-3
SOC 320 Criminology
3-0-3


Women’s Studies Minor

Faculty: Professors Granrose and McKenzie; Associate Professors Bucher, Countryman,
Ference, Hill, Johnson, Lidke, Logsdon-Conradsen, Snider, Troy and Whelan; Assistant Professors Allred and Baker
Cook 337 Telephone: (706) 236-5494

As young men and women enter the twenty-first century, they encounter an entirely new, historically unprecedented set of gender relations. Over the course of the twentieth century, women have increasingly entered the public sphere of work, politics and cultural production, and their position within the private, domestic sphere has changed accordingly. Given this radical revision of the position of women in all aspects of Western culture, it is appropriate for students to explore the causes of this gender revolution, to examine its effects in the present and to analyze the future possibilities for harmonious adjustment to it. The minor in women’s studies is designed to facilitate these goals, as well as to increase students’ awareness of the impact of changing gender roles on their major fields of study.

The minor in women’s studies requires the successful completion of 18 credit hours. Students are urged to complete WNS 210 Introduction to Women’s Studies as early in their minor program as possible.
 


WOMEN'S STUDIES MINOR: 18 hours
Students must complete:   
WNS 210 Introduction to Women’s Studies
3-0-3
WNS 412 Women’s Studies Seminar
3-0-3
  And four courses chosen from the following:   
ANT 320 Women in Global Perspective
3-0-3
ART 413WI Women and Art
3-0-3
BUS 212 Gender and Business
3-0-3
COM 418 Gender and Media
3-0-3
EDU 409 Gender and Education
3-0-3
ENG 432 Studies in Southern Literature - Southern Women Writers*
3-0-3
ENG 342 Women’s Literature
3-0-3
ENG 434 Gender and Language
3-0-3
FLM 418 Women Directors*
3-0-3
GOV 350 Women and Politics
3-0-3
HIS 375WI U.S. Women’s History
3-0-3
MUS 346 Women in Music
3-0-3
PSY 303 Health Psychology in Sociocultural Context*
3-0-3
PSY 385WI Psychology of Women
3-0-3
REL 320 Biblical Women
3-0-3
REL 326 Goddess Tradition of Asia*
3-0-3
REL 331 Christian Faith and Feminist Critique
3-0-3
REL 382 Women in World Religions
3-0-3
SOC 335 Social Inequality; Race, Class and Gender
3-0-3
THE 228 Women and Drama*
3-0-3
WNS 344 Special Topics in Women’s Studies
3-0-3
WNS 387 Gender, Law and Society
3-0-3
WNS 496 Academic Internship
1 to 3 hours
WNS 498 Directed Study
1 to 3 hours
  *These courses will only count for the minor when taught with the specific title shown.  

Certificate in Latin American and Caribbean Studies

Faculty: Assistant Professor Slade
Evans 206A Telephone: (706) 233-4081 E-mail:  dslade@berry.edu

The Latin American and Caribbean Studies program offers Berry students the opportunity to explore one of the world’s most diverse and fascinating regions. Latino immigration to the United States and the increasing importance of Latin America in the global economy mean that there is a growing need for persons with the skills necessary for communicating effectively with people from this region. Students certified in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, therefore, are at an advantage in nearly any job pool. They are at a special advantage when competing for positions in companies with business interests in Latin America; health care and social work professionals; journalism; federal and state government careers; graduate programs in the social sciences; professional degree programs in fields such as public policy, public health, social work and business; and education, from elementary grades through higher education.

In order to earn a Certificate in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, students must complete 12 hours of coursework, including the LCS gateway course, “Peoples of Latin America and the Caribbean” (LCS 301). Additional hours may be completed by taking selected courses from a wide array of disciplines, including the sciences, the social sciences, the humanities, education and business. Students must also demonstrate intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish, French or Portuguese. This requirement may be fulfilled either by passing a 200-level language course or by passing a language competency exam.

Students earning the LCS Certificate are strongly encouraged to study abroad in a Latin American or Caribbean country and/or carry out a LCS-related internship, either locally or abroad.

Students interested in earning a Certificate in Latin American and Caribbean Studies should consult the LCS Web site (http://www.berry.edu/academics/humanities/lcs/) and contact the LCS program director for more information and an application form.
 


CERTITIFICATE REQUIREMENTS: 12 hours
LCS 301

Peoples of Latin America and the Caribbean

3-0-3
  Students must complete 9 hours chosen from among the following:   
LCS/SOC 310 Latinos in the United States
3-0-3
ART 330WI Pre-Columbian and Latin American Art
3-0-3
BIO 482 Coral Reef Ecology*
2-4-4
BIO 483 Tropical Biodiversity and Conservation*
2-4-4
EDU 222 Exploration in Diverse Cultures (LAC sites only)
1-4-3
GOV 358 Politics of Latin America
3-0-3
HIS 358 Latin American History
3-0-3
LCS 450 Seminar in Latin American and
Caribbean Studies
3-0-3
LCS 496 Academic Internship
3 to 6 hours
LCS 498 Directed Study
1 to 3 hours
SPA 311 Survey of Spanish-American Literature
3-0-3
SPA 324 Hispanic Culture
3-0-3
SPA 403 Contemporary Spanish-American Literature
3-0-3
  With permission of the director, students may also choose from among the following courses:   
ANT 380 Applying Anthropology
3-0-3
BUS 410 International Business
3-0-3
ENG 332 Postcolonial Literature
3-0-3
SPA 404WI Spanish Business Communication
3-0-3
SPA 405 Topics in Spanish
3-0-3
  *Limited to Latin American and Caribbean sites only  


Religion and Philosophy

Faculty: Professors Kennedy and McKenzie; Associate Professors Hill, Lidke, and Papazian;
Evans Hall, Room 102 Telephone: (706) 236-2279

Courses in religion and philosophy demand rigorous study and willingness to examine objectively and sympathetically various religious and philosophical viewpoints. The objective of the study of religion and philosophy is to enable students to gain a greater understanding of their own heritage and outlook and the heritage and outlook of others.

The department offers a major in religion and philosophy with a concentration in either area; a dual concentration in religion and philosophy; a minor in religion; and a minor in philosophy.

It also offers the opportunity to structure a strong interdisciplinary major with philosophy or religion as the core. See the section on Interdisciplinary Studies.

A major in religion and philosophy consists of 36 semester hours, including the 3-hour general-education requirement. Since religion and philosophy majors earn the Bachelor of Arts degree, they must meet the foreign-language requirements of that degree.

The combined religion and philosophy major can provide a strong liberal-arts concentration. This major prepares students for theological seminary; law or business schools; or graduate work in religion, philosophy and other fields in the humanities.
 


RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY MAJOR (CONCENTRATION IN PHILOSOPHY): 36 hours


Students are required to take:   
REL 425WI Senior Thesis 3-0-3
And one course from each of the following areas: 
The Christian Tradition REL 101, 102, 103, 305WI or 320
World Religions REL 100, 326, 372 or 382
Ethics REL 107, 358, 359WI or 375WI
plus six additional courses in religion, at least five of which must be at the 300 or 400 level, and two courses in philosophy.


RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY MAJOR (CONCENTRATION IN PHILOSOPHY): 36 hours

Students are required to take:     
PHI 150 Introduction to Philosophy 3-0-3
PHI 152 Critical Thinking or   
PHI 353 Symbolic Logic 3-0-3
PHI 351 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 3-0-3
PHI 352 Early Modern Philosophy 3-0-3
PHI 425WI Senior Thesis 3-0-3
plus five additional courses in philosophy and two courses in religion.    


RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY MAJOR (DUAL CONCENTRATION):  at least 63 hours


Students must complete the specific requirements for the concentration in religion and the concentration in philosophy, including elective courses. Up to six hours of the same course work may count toward the requirements for both the religion and the philosophy concentration. However, students with the dual concentration are only required to complete REL/PHI 425 once.

 

MINOR IN RELIGION: 21 hours

REL 100 World Religions or   
REL 101 Interpreting the Old Testament or   
REL 102 Interpreting the New Testament
3-0-3
plus one course in philosophy and five additional courses in religion,at least three of which must be at the upper level.
18 hours
 
MINOR IN PHILOSOPHY: 21 hours
PHI 150 Introduction to Philosophy or   
PHI 152 Critical Thinking
3-0-3
plus one course in religion and five additional courses in philosophy,at least three of which must be at the upper level.
18 hours

Sociology and Anthropology

Faculty: Associate Professors Lewinson and McConkey; Assistant Professors Allred, Baker, Knowlton, and Sundblad
Evans Hall, Room 109B Telephone: (706) 236-2222; Fax: (706) 236-2205

 

Sociology and anthropology develop our understanding of what it means to be human by exploring the differences and similarities within and between cultures and societies.  These disciplines study the organization of groups as well as the experiences and values of their members.  They give insight into human belief and behavior in groups ranging from a small community organization to a large multicultural society.  Through hands-on activities, students learn how to conduct ethnographic research, data analysis, and community-based research, as well as improve their writing and critical thinking.  These skills enable our majors to understand, work with, and train those who will work with people from many backgrounds.  After graduation, majors are prepared to work in fields such as social work, business, education, missions, human relations, museums and cultural heritage, public health, the non-profit sector, environmental advocacy, law enforcement, and government.   Others continue their education in graduate programs at leading universities.  A sociology and anthropology degree also helps prepare students going on to professional programs in law, medicine, public health, and urban planning, among others.

Sociology and anthropology majors may pursue either a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree.  Students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete the foreign-language requirements for that degree.  Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree must successfully complete a minimum of six courses that fulfill the quantitative course requirements for the B.S. degree.  Though not required, Bachelor of Science majors are strongly encouraged to take at least eight hours of a foreign language as well.


SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY MAJOR: 39 hours

The sociology and anthropology major includes nine hours of Level 1 core courses, six hours of Level 2 core courses, 12 hours of Level 3 courses (in area/s of concentration), three hours of Level 4 course work (Senior Project), and an additional nine hours of electives within the major.

Majors may choose one of two concentrations—sociology or anthropology. Alternatively, majors may elect to have a dual concentration in both sociology and anthropology. A concentration in sociology consists of 12 hours of Level 3 SOC courses. A concentration in anthropology consists of 12 hours of Level 3 ANT courses. Students who choose to have a dual concentration must complete both 12 hours of Level 3 SOC courses and 12 hours of LEVEL 3 ANT courses in addition to the core courses, electives and Senior Project.

Ideally, students should progress through the following sequence of courses chronologically, taking Level 1 courses first and finishing with the Level 4 course. However, students may take Level 2 and Level 3 courses concurrently.

Level 1 Core Courses 9 hours
The following must be taken by all sociology and anthropology majors:
 

ANT 200 Cultural Anthropology
3-0-3
MAT 111 Elementary Statistics
3-0-3
SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology
3-0-3


Level 2 Core Courses 6 hours
The following must be taken by all sociology and anthropology majors:
 

SOC or ANT 300WI Social Theory
3-0-3
SOC or ANT 305WI Social-Science Research Methods
3-0-3


Level 3 Courses for the Sociology Concentration:
To earn a concentration in sociology, students must complete four of the following:
 

SOC 225 Social Problems
3-0-3
SOC 310 Latinos in the United States
3-0-3
SOC 320 Criminology
3-0-3
SOC 335 Social Inequality: Race, Class and Gender
3-0-3
SOC 345 Sociology of Health
3-0-3
SOC 350 Sociology of the Family
3-0-3
SOC 355 Environmental Sociology
3-0-3
SOC 370 Sociology of Religion
3-0-3
SOC 387 Gender, Law and Society
3-0-3
SOC 450 Seminar in Sociology
3-0-3
SOC 496 Academic Internship
3 to 6 hours
SOC 498 Directed Study
1 to 3 hours


Level 3 Courses for the Anthropology Concentration:
To earn a concentration in anthropology, students must complete four of the following:
 

ANT 301 Peoples of Latin America and the Caribbean
3-0-3
ANT 320 Women in Global Perspective
3-0-3
ANT 325 Anthropology of Popular Culture
3-0-3
ANT 330 Anthropology of the Body
3-0-3
ANT 340 Globalization and Local Communities
3-0-3
ANT 350 African Cultures
3-0-3
ANT 380 Applying Anthropology
3-0-3
ANT 390 Urban Anthropology
3-0-3
ANT 450 Seminar in Anthropology
3-0-3
ANT 496 Academic Internship
3 to 6 hours
ANT 498 Directed Study
1 to 3 hours


Level 4 Courses 3 hours
One of the following two courses must be completed by all sociology and anthropology majors, depending on concentration:
 

ANT or SOC 480WI Senior Project
3-0-3

Electives 9 hours
Majors must also complete nine additional hours of SOC or ANT courses, or courses in other disciplines approved by the department. (Please see your advisor or the department chair for a list of these courses.) These courses may not count toward the major’s area of concentration.
 


SOCIOLOGY MINOR REQUIREMENTS 18 hours

To earn a minor in sociology, students must complete the following:   
SOC 200
Introduction to Sociology
3-0-3
ANT 200 Cultural Anthropology
3-0-3
and 12 additional hours of sociology courses, nine of which must be at the 300 level or above.


ANTHROPOLOGY MINOR REQUIREMENTS 18 hours

To earn a minor in anthropology, students must complete the following:   
ANT 200
Cultural Anthropology
3-0-3
SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology
3-0-3
and 12 additional hours of anthropology courses, nine of which must be at the 300 level or above. One of the following courses may be substituted for a single anthropology course: SOC 335 or SOC 355.
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